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When Is A Record Not A Record?

  • By Duncan Larkin
  • Published Apr. 26, 2011
Geoffrey Mutai's world-leading time at Boston will not count as a world record. Photo: AP

Geoffrey Mutai's world-leading time at Boston will not count as a world record. Photo: AP

Geoffrey Mutai’s world-leading time at Boston won’t count as a world record.

In light of Geoffrey Mutai’s 2:03:02 clocking at the Boston Marathon earlier this month, BBC writer Mark Butler analyzes why it will not be ruled as a new world record. The reason: Boston is an aided course.

Why?

Buter writes that  ”IAAF Rule 260.28a states: ‘The start and finish points of a course, measured along a theoretical straight line between them, shall not be further apart than 50% of the race distance.’ In Boston the separation figure is 91%, making it an extreme example of a “point-to-point” course.”

The reason for the ruling is to prevent athletes from benefitting from a tailwind, which was the case in Boston, where winds exceeded 14mph at times during the race.

“The maximum allowable assisting wind for track events is just two meters per second or around 4.5mph,” Butler writes. If Usain Bolt had run a 100m race on a track with the same conditions as Boston, his time would have been ruled as heavily wind-assisted.

For More: BBC

FILED UNDER: Boston Marathon / News TAGS: / / / / / / / / / /

Duncan Larkin

Duncan Larkin

Duncan Larkin is the news editor at Competitor.com and a freelance journalist who’s been covering the sport of running for over five years. He’s run 2:32 in the marathon and won the Himalayan 100-Mile Stage Race in 2007. His first running book, RUN SIMPLE, was released last July.

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