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Why Are Extreme Running Events Gaining In Popularity?

  • By Duncan Larkin
  • Published Aug. 10, 2011
  • Updated Aug. 10, 2011 at 9:48 AM UTC
The Canadian Death Race is an example of a race that pushes the limits of human endurance. Photo: Monumental Effort.com

The Canadian Death Race is an example of a race that pushes the limits of human endurance. Photo: Monumental Effort.com

One doctor thinks humans have always been pushing the limits.

As running continues to get more and more popular, there seems to be a increase in the amount of extreme races. What’s the reason for this increase? The National Post seeks to find an answer to this question in an article on the subject. An example is the Canadian Death Race, a 125K race across the Canadian Rockies.

“If you’re not in the subculture, it’s very difficult to communicate, but I don’t think of ultra-running as something like skydiving,” admitted two-time Death Race finisher Dr. Nick Holt, who is an associate professor in the Faculty of Physical Education at the University of Alberta.

Holt is working on a paper about his experiences in the race.

“You feel worse than you’ve ever felt before, but you have to keep going, and there’s just very few circumstances in life where you have to push forward when every fibre of your body tells you to stop,” he said. “Once you’re in it, it consumes you.”

For More: The National Post

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Duncan Larkin

Duncan Larkin

Duncan Larkin is the news editor at Competitor.com and a freelance journalist who’s been covering the sport of running for over five years. He’s run 2:32 in the marathon and won the Himalayan 100-Mile Stage Race in 2007. His first running book, RUN SIMPLE, was released last July.

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