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After Olympics, London Not Losing Its Track

  • By Duncan Larkin
  • Published Oct. 13, 2011
  • Updated Oct. 13, 2011 at 10:08 AM UTC
Any future lease of London's Olympic stadium will require keeping its state-of-the-art running track. Photo: Telegraph

The U.K. Sports Minister says that Britain needs a unique venue for track and field.

Any future lease of London's Olympic stadium will require keeping its state-of-the-art running track. Photo: Telegraph

Despite the fact that London may lose its bid for the 2017 World Athletics Championships, organizers of next year’s Olympics say the track will not go anywhere.

Sports Minister Hugh Robinson said on Wednesday that any party interested in renting the famed Olympic stadium will have to keep the track for the life of the lease, which could be up to 50 years.

“The track will absolutely be retained for the duration, that will be a non-negotiable part of any lease,” he said. “We have got fantastic stadiums in this country for all our major sports; Wembley, Twickenham, Lord’s, Wimbledon, but athletics is the only one without a national stadium.”

The winning bid for the 2017 World Athletics Championships will be announced on November 11. The other city in contention is Doha, Qatar.

Lord Sebastian Coe, the 2012 London Olympics chairman, said that keeping the track will strengthen London’s hand in the bidding process with the IAAF.

For More: Telegraph

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Duncan Larkin

Duncan Larkin

Duncan Larkin is the news editor at Competitor.com and a freelance journalist who’s been covering the sport of running for over five years. He’s run 2:32 in the marathon and won the Himalayan 100-Mile Stage Race in 2007. His first running book, RUN SIMPLE, was released last July.

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