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What It’s Like To Be Beating The East Africans

  • By Duncan Larkin
  • Published Oct. 18, 2011
David Berdan had established a significant early lead in last weekend's Baltimore Marathon. Photo: BALTV.com

One relatively unknown runner found out last weekend in Baltimore.

David Berdan had established a significant early lead in last weekend's Baltimore Marathon. Photo: BALTV.com

The famous artist, Andy Warhol, once quipped that, “in the future, everyone will be world-famous for 15 minutes.”

This quote proved true at last weekend’s Baltimore Marathon when David Berdan,  a relatively unknown local runner, found himself well ahead of the leaders.

“The first mile we were going a lot slower than the pace I wanted to go,” Berdan, a cross-country coach at the Garrison Forest School, recalled afterwards. “I took the lead and thought they would go with me and they just let me go, and by the five-mile marker I was a minute ahead.”

Berdan held on to the lead for much longer than Warhol’s 15 minutes–all the way to the 11-mile mark. At that point, however, the real race began and the Kenyans and Ethiopians in the chase pack decided to pick up the pace significantly.

“I didn’t slow down; they picked it up,” he said. “I knew it was going to happen eventually,”

Berdan ended up finishing 10th overall.

For More: WBALTV.com

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Duncan Larkin

Duncan Larkin

Duncan Larkin is the news editor at Competitor.com and a freelance journalist who’s been covering the sport of running for over five years. He’s run 2:32 in the marathon and won the Himalayan 100-Mile Stage Race in 2007. His first running book, RUN SIMPLE, was released last July.

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