Track Time: For Best Results, Start Running On The Oval

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Mixed Intervals

As their name suggests, mixed interval workouts are a mixture of two or more of the three interval lengths discussed above. Because they do not focus on a single, specific intensity, mixed interval workouts are not as useful as short, middle-length, or long intervals for boosting specific components of running fitness. However, they are very useful for maintaining fitness in each of the components addressed by the three interval lengths.

Therefore, runners typically rely on mixed intervals during the final weeks of training before a race, after they have already developed their speed, VO2 max, and lactate threshold with short, middle-length, and long interval workouts, and simply want to maintain these capabilities while sharpening for a race.

Mixed intervals are also useful as a secondary track workout for advanced runners training for shorter races (5K and 10K). The primary track workout of the week would focus on developing one specific component of running fitness, while the mixed interval workout would provide a smaller stimulus for the same component of running fitness plus a small stimulus for the components of running fitness addressed by the other interval lengths.

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The following are examples of mixed interval workout formats for beginner, intermediate and advanced runners:

Beginner Mixed Intervals Workout
- 1600m
- 1000m
- 600m
- 200m

(400m active recovery after each interval)

Intermediate Mixed Intervals Workout
- 1600m
- 1200m
- 800m
- 400m
- 200m

(400m active recovery after each interval)

Advanced Mixed Intervals Workout
- 400m
- 800m
- 1200m
- 1600m
- 1200m
- 800m
- 400m

(400m active recovery after each interval)

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