Rise And Run: How To Become A Morning Runner

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Change Your Behavior

“Some people have an internal clock that’s a little longer than 24 hours; they are driven by birth to stay up later and it’s impossible for them to go to bed at 10 in the evening. But for other people it’s a behavioral pattern,” explains Marks. “We get use to watching the nightly news and end up just staying up later, fighting our naturally tendency and then you end up in a pattern of staying up late and waking up late.” It may sound like common sense that if you go to bed earlier, you’ll be able to wake up earlier, but Marks sees many people who continue to fight their late-night drowsiness. Changing this behavior and going to bed when tired can be all some people need in winning the fight with their alarm clock. “If you regularly go to bed and wake up at the same time every day your body can get into that rhythm where it just does it on its own,” explains Marks.

Marks notes that a runner already has something going for them in becoming a morning person—running allows you to get more deep sleep and helps you wake up ready to tackle the day. “Exercise does tend to make your sleep more efficient,” she explains. “And getting more deep sleep contributes to waking up feeling rested.”

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