Competitor.com http://running.competitor.com Your Online Source for Running Thu, 18 Sep 2014 02:27:03 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.5.2 2014 Obstacle Course Racing Championship Preview http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/news/2104-obstacle-course-racing-championship-preview_114065 http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/news/2104-obstacle-course-racing-championship-preview_114065#comments Wed, 17 Sep 2014 23:51:50 +0000 Dan England http://running.competitor.com/?p=114065

The 2014 Spartan Race World Championships is one of four OCR championships coming up. Photo: Courtesy of Spartan Race

A guide to the four obstacle course racing championship events this fall.

The post 2014 Obstacle Course Racing Championship Preview appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

The 2014 Spartan Race World Championships is one of four OCR championships coming up. Photo: Courtesy of Spartan Race

Just three days before the 2014 Spartan Race World Championships, Rose Wetzel-Sinnett and her husband, Tim, posted a video on Facebook of her dunking herself under a tub of ice-cold water in her hotel room.

It would have seemed a little strange, if not downright weird, but Rose is an obstacle course racer, and so it almost made sense for her to submerge herself with a dozen buckets of ice floating in it.

Almost.

“She wanted to ‘practice’ cold water,” says Tim, a personal trainer who was against Rose’s idea. “The idea was to then go run. Hey, don’t question the crazy mind of a champion.”

Rose Wetzel-Sinnett, after all, is one of the serious contenders for the Sept. 20-21 Spartan Race World Championships near Rutland, Vt., and she, like many others, is feeling the intensity. Spartan’s never had so many elite athletes competing in one race who have a shot of beating current world champion Amelia Boone.

RELATED: Obstacle Course Racing Goes Big Time!

The next three months is an exciting period of time in the world of obstacle course racing, called “OCR” by the hardcore fans (and who isn’t hardcore in that world?). Aside from Spartan’s World Championships, next up is Warrior Dash, which will host its inaugural event on Oct. 18 in Esparto, Calif. The fourth World’s Toughest Mudder takes place in a new venue, Las Vegas, on Nov. 15-16. There’s also a new championship event, the OCR World Championships, slated for Oct. 25-26 near Cincinnati.

The post 2014 Obstacle Course Racing Championship Preview appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/news/2104-obstacle-course-racing-championship-preview_114065/feed 0
Competitor on Demand: The Hip Drop Exercise http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/training/competitor-demand-hip-drop-exercise_114084 http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/training/competitor-demand-hip-drop-exercise_114084#comments Wed, 17 Sep 2014 22:47:09 +0000 Competitor.com http://running.competitor.com/?p=114084

Strengthen your hips and prevent IT Band injuries with this simple exercise.

The post Competitor on Demand: The Hip Drop Exercise appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

Strengthen your hips and prevent IT Band injuries with this simple exercise that can be done anywhere.

Do 2-3 sets of 10 reps for each side.

RELATED: Competitor on Demand: Lateral Lunges for Quad Strength

The post Competitor on Demand: The Hip Drop Exercise appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/training/competitor-demand-hip-drop-exercise_114084/feed 0
Dimity McDowell: We All Learn From Our (Running) Mistakes http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/saucony-26-strong/dimity-mcdowell-learn-running-mistakes_114051 http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/saucony-26-strong/dimity-mcdowell-learn-running-mistakes_114051#comments Wed, 17 Sep 2014 20:02:18 +0000 Dimity McDowell http://running.competitor.com/?p=114051

Dimity McDowell can never go wrong with a dog and a trail run. Photo: Dimity McDowell

Dimity McDowell has learned several lessons during her life as a runner.

The post Dimity McDowell: We All Learn From Our (Running) Mistakes appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

Dimity McDowell can never go wrong with a dog and a trail run. Photo: Dimity McDowell

Asking me for one mistake I’ve made while training or in a race is like asking me to eat just one M&M: impossible. While I’ve never thrown up during or after a race—not sure if that’s a good or a bad thing—I’ve definitely run enough miles to have more than a few mistakes under my soles.

A few themes I’ve noticed through them:

Not Listening To My Body

Easy to type; so dang hard to do when I’ve had my eye on a race, and I’ve been training diligently. Out of nowhere, a bone decides to fracture or a muscle decides to go on strike. But that “out of nowhere” part actually isn’t true. A running injury—usually the result of doing the same motion again and again—rarely just appears. I ran while my heel protested greatly … and guess what? It fractured. I ran while my left hip muscles felt like they were going to tear apart … and guess what? They didn’t, thankfully, but they whined for years.

Lesson learned: I’ve become significantly more proactive with prehab—keeping my body healthy on the front end instead of waiting for it to become injured—over the past three years. I foam roll regularly to keep my muscles loose, attend Pilates once or twice weekly to keep my core strong and take a day off when I’m wiped out, even if the calendar says I should be training.

Not Studying Up On A Race

I’m typically a wing-it kind of girl who doesn’t obsess over race courses. If there’s going to be a killer hill at mile 8, I’ll confront that bad boy at mile 8 … no need to expend energy worrying about it before then. While that laissez-faire attitude can serve me well, it’s also caused me to go out way too fast in half-marathons (Hello bonk! Nice to meet you here at mile 11!) or not have enough umph in my legs to climb steep hills because I’d trained on flat ground.

Lesson learned: When I’m running a race with a pal for fun, I’m totally fine running blind. But when I’m gunning for a specific time or have put in copious amounts of training, I’ve learned it’s best not to be ignorant. I trained for eight months for Ironman Couer d’Alene, mimicking the course profile as best I could during training, and then drove the course, pre-race. The preparation contributed to it being one of the best days of my life.

Not Enjoying The Ride

Running is inherently hard, so I’d be kidding myself if I thought every run could be enjoyable. But I’ve gone through phases where I became so fixated on numbers—splits, pace, mileage, feet climbed—and making them bigger and faster that my mentality sucked the joy out of my running. While I like to push my limits, I’m never going to win my age-group—let alone a race—so if I don’t find some slice of contentment and happiness in some of my miles, I’m not sure why I would keep running.

Lesson learned: It took an injury (see the first item above) that sidelined me for nearly six months from running to find the joy again. Once I healed, I started as a beginner and decided to leave all my devices—GPS, watch, music—at home, and just be where my feet were. Now, when I get a little too carried away with the numbers, I leave it all behind and just run.

For more on the Saucony 26 Strong program, which pairs up 13 coaches with 13 marathon rookies, visit 26Strong.com.

The post Dimity McDowell: We All Learn From Our (Running) Mistakes appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/saucony-26-strong/dimity-mcdowell-learn-running-mistakes_114051/feed 0
Workout of the Week: The Michigan http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/training/workout-week-michigan_114032 http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/training/workout-week-michigan_114032#comments Wed, 17 Sep 2014 20:00:41 +0000 Mario Fraioli http://running.competitor.com/?p=114032

The Michigan workout blends a variety of speeds to simulate the pace changes that often happen in a race. Photo: www.shutterstock.com

Get used to pace changes in a race with this interval workout.

The post Workout of the Week: The Michigan appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

The Michigan workout blends a variety of speeds to simulate the pace changes that often happen in a race. Photo: www.shutterstock.com

Get used to pace changes in a race with this interval workout.

In my first practice as a member of the Boston Athletic Association racing team in 2004, the group workout was led by John Mortimer, a former seven-time All-American at the University of Michigan and one of the most competitive steeplechasers in the country at the time. The session he had on tap for us that night was “The Michigan”—one of the staple workouts he did as a Wolverine training under the watchful eye of legendary coach Ron Warhurst.

While there are a few different variations of The Michigan, the gist of the workout is to blend off-track tempo running with faster repetitions on the oval. You can manipulate the pace and the length of the intervals to your liking, but at the end of the day this session is meant to simulate the pace changes that often occur during a race. For Warhurst’s charges, this was one of their key workouts to prepare for 8K-10K cross country racing. But with a little tweaking to suit your own needs, competitive age-group runners can make an iteration of this session work for 5K, 10K, half marathon or marathon preparation.

Here’s how to do a standard version of The Michigan:

— Warm up with 2-3 miles of easy jogging followed by 4-6 x 20-second strides.

— Run 1 mile (4 laps) on the track at your current 10K race pace.

— After the mile on the track, jog 2-3 minutes off the track to the start of where you’ll run a mile at your tempo run pace. An out-and-back stretch of road or dirt loop work well for this part of the workout.

— Run 1 mile off the track at your tempo pace, or roughly 20 seconds per mile slower than the mile you just ran on the track.

— After completing the mile off the track, jog 2-3 minutes back to the track for the next interval.

— Back on the track, run 1,200m (3 laps) at your current 10K pace, aiming to hit the same lap splits you ran for the first mile of the workout.

— After the 1,200 on the track, jog 2-3 minutes off the track back to the start of where you’ll run your second tempo mile.

— Run 1 mile off the track at your tempo pace.

— After completing the mile off the track, jog 2-3 minutes back to the track for the third interval.

— Back on the track, run 800m (2 laps) at your current 5K race pace, or roughly 4-5 seconds per lap faster than you ran your first two track intervals.

— After the 800 on the track, jog 2-3 minutes off the track back to the start of where you’ll run your third (and last) tempo mile.

— Run 1 mile off the track at your tempo pace.

— After completing the mile off the track, jog 2-3 minutes back to the track for the last interval.

— Back on the track, run 400m (1 lap) faster than your current 5K race pace, or as if you were finishing the last quarter mile of a race. Focus on running fast but relaxed—hold your form!

— Cool down with 2-3 miles of easy jogging, stretch, refuel.

 

 

The post Workout of the Week: The Michigan appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/training/workout-week-michigan_114032/feed 0
LA Marathon To Host 2015 USATF Championships http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/news/la-marathon-host-2015-usatf-championships_114041 http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/news/la-marathon-host-2015-usatf-championships_114041#comments Wed, 17 Sep 2014 19:30:32 +0000 Competitor.com http://running.competitor.com/?p=114041

Photo: www.shutterstock.com

The city is also slated to host the 2016 Olympic Trials Marathon.

The post LA Marathon To Host 2015 USATF Championships appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

Photo: www.shutterstock.com

The city is also slated to host the 2016 Olympic Trials Marathon.

Los Angeles will host the 2015 USATF Marathon Championships, it was announced Wednesday.

The race will take place in conjunction with the LA Marathon on March 15. In February 2016, Los Angeles will also host the 2016 U.S. Olympic Marathon Trials.

Runners in the national championships field will compete for a total prize purse of $150,000, in addition to the overall field’s prize purse of $110,000.

“We are very excited for Los Angeles to host the 2015 USATF Marathon Championships,” USATF CEO Max Siegel said in a press release. “Having an opportunity to collaborate on the race will help set the stage for a spectacular Olympic Trials Marathon. We look forward to working with LA Marathon LLC in March and beyond.”

The “Stadium to the Sea” course begins at Dodger Stadium and ends near the Santa Monica Pier. The 26.2-mile route takes runners past several Los Angeles landmarks.

“Hosting the 2015 USATF Marathon Championships will be a proud moment in Los Angeles’ rich marathon history,” said Tracey Russell, Chief Executive of LA Marathon LLC. “We look forward to showcasing our nation’s top marathoners in 2015 while setting the stage for the 2016 US Olympic Trials Marathon.”

The last time the USATF Marathon Championships were in Los Angeles was 1994, and that was only for men. Both genders will compete for national titles on the streets of L.A. next March.

Runners can begin registering Oct. 1 at 9 a.m. PT.

The post LA Marathon To Host 2015 USATF Championships appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/news/la-marathon-host-2015-usatf-championships_114041/feed 0
Gear of the Week: T1 Pro Light Running Race Belt http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/shoes-and-gear/gear-week-t1-pro-light-running-race-belt_114031 http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/shoes-and-gear/gear-week-t1-pro-light-running-race-belt_114031#comments Wed, 17 Sep 2014 17:51:11 +0000 Allison Pattillo http://running.competitor.com/?p=114031

Race belts are not just for triathletes.

Race belts prevent pinholes in your running gear and allow you to more easily carry food and other small items.

The post Gear of the Week: T1 Pro Light Running Race Belt appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

Race belts are not just for triathletes.

Race belts prevent pinholes in your running gear and allow you to more easily carry food and other small items.

If you think race number belts are just for triathletes, think again. Attaching your bib to a belt gives ultimate flexibility when it comes to adding or removing layers, and it ends awkward pre-race fiddling with pins and eliminates pinholes in clothing.

The T1 Pro Light belt makes up for any negligible weight addition to your kit by being incredibly useful. Sure it holds your number, but you can also order it with 10 elastic gel loops for holding gels, an inhaler (because those things never fit in pockets), running gloves or anything else you need to stash. Race numbers are attached to secure nylon cords equipped with lace locks. The holders are on sliders to accommodate different sized bibs. Even better, the adjustable T1 Pro Light stays put thanks to a polymer grip on the inside of the belt.

Price: $17
Info: t1belt.com

The post Gear of the Week: T1 Pro Light Running Race Belt appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/shoes-and-gear/gear-week-t1-pro-light-running-race-belt_114031/feed 0
Cody Moat: Obstacle Course Star And Trail Running Champion http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/news/ocr-star-cody-moat_113610 http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/news/ocr-star-cody-moat_113610#comments Wed, 17 Sep 2014 17:31:00 +0000 Dan England http://running.competitor.com/?p=113610

Cody Moat is one of the country's top obstacle racers and also a two-time U.S. trail running champion. Phot: Josh Gibney/Spartan Race

Cody Moat will be a top contender in the 2014 Spartan Race World Championships.

The post Cody Moat: Obstacle Course Star And Trail Running Champion appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

Cody Moat is one of the country's top obstacle racers and also a two-time U.S. trail running champion. Phot: Josh Gibney/Spartan Race

Cody Moat is one of the country's top obstacle racers and also a two-time U.S. trail running champion. Phot: Josh Gibney/Spartan Race

Cody Moat is one of the country’s top obstacle racers and also a two-time U.S. trail running champion. Phot: Josh Gibney/Spartan Race

Cody Moat will be a top contender in the 2014 Spartan Race World Championships.

One one level, Cody Moat seems like a pretty boring American Dad. The 36-year-old from Fillmore, Utah, teaches woods, construction and drafting in high school and has four kids—two daughters aged 12 and 6 and two boys aged 9 and 4. But he’s also an elite obstacle course racer, an alter ego of sorts that takes him all over the country as a member of the Spartan Race pro team. He was Spartan’s world champion in both the Beast and the Ultra Beast in 2012 and has placed high in many others in longer distances, though he did win a Spartan Race Sprint last year in Montana. He also won the 2012 U.S. trail marathon national championships in Moab, Utah, and the 2013 U.S. 50-mile trail running national championship in Neuces, Texas, his first ultra. In college, he was a four-time conference champion while running for Southern Utah University, twice in the 3,000-meter steeplechase and once each in the 5,000- and 10,000-meter runs. In high school, he was a three-time state champion in cross country and wrestling.

How did you get into obstacle racing?
I have a friend who had done the Utah Spartan Beast the year before. He asked me if I would be interested in joining his team. I was a little reluctant, but I chose to do so. My first Spartan race went really well so Spartan started to fly me to races.

How often do you race?
I try to race once a month, but that doesn’t always happen. I race a little more in the summer.

RELATED: Junyong Pak: 2:32 Marathoner + OCR Star

Have you thought about doing obstacle racing full time?
No, I have not thought about doing obstacle racing full time for two main reasons. One, I still do not believe there is enough money in obstacle racing to provide for a family. Two, one major injury and there goes your career.

What events do you do?
I do obstacle racing, anywhere from three to 26 miles. I also do trail racing and ultra marathons. I enjoy both of these different events, as long as these races are on trails.

What was is your athletic background?
Before OCR racing, I was a competitive athlete for Southern Utah University, where I ran cross country, indoor track and outdoor track.

What does your training schedule look like every week?
It’s hard to put my workout into miles per week because everyday is a little different. One day might be 10 miles, another day might only be 6 but with hard obstacles and exercises. One day may be swimming and lifting while another day might be a long run of 12-20 miles on trails. I take one day at a time and try to listen to my body to determine what my next workout will be.

How do you balance out your training with your family given that you have four children?
I wake up and work out at 5 a.m., long before the kids ever get up. Then I go to work, and after work I try to spend some time with my family. Then sometimes later in the evening I will work out again or I my have my family work out with me. We usually go to the weight room together, or I wrestle with my boys, or we’ll go on a hike. Just about anything.

RELATED: 2014 Obstacle Course World Championships

The post Cody Moat: Obstacle Course Star And Trail Running Champion appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/news/ocr-star-cody-moat_113610/feed 0
Striders 101: Becoming A Faster Runner http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/training/become-a-faster-runner-by-using-striders_114020 http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/training/become-a-faster-runner-by-using-striders_114020#comments Wed, 17 Sep 2014 17:17:00 +0000 Cait Chock http://running.competitor.com/?p=114020

Add some striders into your training runs and reap the benefits. Photo: www.shutterstock.com

These short bursts during a training run teach your body how to run faster.

The post Striders 101: Becoming A Faster Runner appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

Add some striders into your training runs and reap the benefits. Photo: www.shutterstock.com

These short bursts during a training run teach your body how to run faster.

The stride gets your body keyed up to run fast. Strides are commonplace in preparation before hard workouts and races, but the stride can be implemented as a training tool outside the warmup.

Let’s start with the basics of a stride: running loose and relaxed and ranging from 60-150 meters—short bursts of controlled speed. The aim is not to go all-out but instead is to gradually introduce a faster tempo. Think of the number of strides you do as a progression, each one getting slightly faster than the last.

From definition to application, there are a number of different ways runners can insert strides into their training between hard workouts. As these short bursts aren’t taxing enough to drain your legs, strides offer the unique benefit of being able to sneak in quality in addition to strengthening a runner’s neuromuscular response. Strides are excellent ways to get your legs used to a faster turnover rate without tiring the body very much.

Easy Runs Plus Strides

The first place to start adding strides is after your easy runs. Finish your run with 4-6 strides, giving yourself a jogging or standing rest between. Go into each stride recovered, but because each stride isn’t all-out you shouldn’t need more than 60-90 seconds between each.

“I do strides on my easy days after my run,” says PUMA runner Morgan Gonzalez. “This reminds my body to run fastest at the end of a workout or race, practice good form, loosen up any tightness and prime my body to run fast the next day during my workout.”

Start by doing simple striders one or two days a week, after your easy runs, and gradually build from there.

Strides can also be inserted within your easy runs; sprinkle them in after a couple miles. These should feel relaxed and you shouldn’t worry about the time or length between each one. Don’t think of this as a workout—without stress, adding these strides should actually feel freeing and fun. There is no set length or pace—just embrace the feeling of running at a faster pace.

RELATED: Safe Strategies For Developing Basic Speed

Bust Out Of A Bad Run

Every runner knows the feeling of a flat run, or even a straight-up bad run. They are commonplace, and come with the territory for a runner in training. Interestingly enough, you can sometimes break out of a stale run by introducing some strides. It sounds counterintuitive, (why would running faster feel any better?) but because running at a quicker pace will cause you to shift into a different energy system during the faster bout, your pace will feel easier when settling back into your easy pace.

Sometimes your body needs the change of pace to reset; running is one of the most repetitive actions around and your legs can get stuck in a cadence rut, which results in that stale feeling. Strides certainly can’t prevent you from never having a flat run ever again, but they can turn some of those runs around—which is not only much more enjoyable but also gives you the added fitness benefit of having those pick-ups.

Hill Strides

Once you’ve gotten used to adding standard strides into your training, you can experiment with hill strides to build even more power behind that speed. The key is to keep these bursts short (think 10 seconds) and ensure that you’re giving yourself ample recovery. In order to keep this from turning into too much of a workout, these strides have to be short and should not be all-out, and a little more recovery is needed.

Think of these like mini-plyometrics which, over time, will add up. These hill sessions can even be done in a double-day style; coming back later in the afternoon of an easy run for some loose strides after a short warm-up. More advanced runners can even come back in the afternoon of a hard workout for some short speed bursts.

RELATED: Hit The Hills, Reap The Benefits

Training The Neuromuscular Response

Running faster requires nerve passageways to be built and having taught those synapses to fire more quickly. Even with the strongest legs in the world, a runner still needs to teach his or her feet to cycle faster before that strength can translate into faster times. That is why things like strides, quick-feet drills and ladder drills are important to take advantage of.

Distance runners tend to tense up any time they think they need to run fast; to avoid trying too hard, remind yourself to relax and stay loose because that will ultimately enable you to run faster. Stop stressing and just run!

“If I’m tight or tired, I make sure my strides are relaxed and focused on form,” Gonzalez says. “At least once a week I push the pace and shorten the strides to 8-12 seconds to help recruit my fast twitch muscles and speed.”

Strides are merely a tool to get you running above your easy pace and practicing turn-over, so don’t hold any hard and fast expectations.

By introducing more strides into your regular weekly routine, that extra time spent at a faster rate will improve both your neuromuscular and muscular ability to feel more relaxed and in control while running up-tempo. Sneak those strides into the mix outside of your warmup routine and you’ll gain fitness, speed and even have a tool to bust out of some of those crummy runs!

 

****

About The Author: 

Caitlin Chock (caitchock.com) set the then National High School 5K Record (15:52.88) in 2004 and previously ran for Nike. A freelance writer, artist and designer, she writes about all things running and founded Ezzere, her own line of running shirts (www.ezzere.com). You can read more, see her running comics, and her shirts at her website.

The post Striders 101: Becoming A Faster Runner appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/training/become-a-faster-runner-by-using-striders_114020/feed 0
Photos: Run Rabbit Run Trail Race http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/photos/photos-run-rabbit-run-trail-race_113993 http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/photos/photos-run-rabbit-run-trail-race_113993#comments Wed, 17 Sep 2014 16:57:47 +0000 Allison Pattillo http://running.competitor.com/?p=113993

The epic trail race took place last weekend in Steamboat Springs, Colo. Here are photos from the event.

The post Photos: Run Rabbit Run Trail Race appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

Tortoises and hares alike gathered in Steamboat Springs, Colo., this past weekend for the eighth annual Run Rabbit Run trail race. Runners could choose between the roughly 100-mile or roughly 50-mile distances. For the 250 brave souls who signed up for the longer distance, they were divided into tortoises and hares. The tortoises were allowed to use pacers and poles and had up to 36 hours to finish the race. The hares, were racing for a $50,000 prize purse (the top tortoises also received a nibble of the very large carrot), weren’t allowed to use pacers or poles and started four hours after the tortoises. Here are the images from the race, taken by Paul Nelson:

The post Photos: Run Rabbit Run Trail Race appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/photos/photos-run-rabbit-run-trail-race_113993/feed 0
The Everyman: An Ode To Caffeine http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/staff-blog/the-everyman/the-everyman-an-ode-to-caffeine_113942 http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/staff-blog/the-everyman/the-everyman-an-ode-to-caffeine_113942#comments Tue, 16 Sep 2014 23:23:42 +0000 Jason Devaney http://running.competitor.com/?p=113942

Whatever your preferred form of caffeine is, it has many benefits in moderate amounts. Photo: www.shutterstock.com

Jason Devaney writes about the evolution of coffee in his life.

The post The Everyman: An Ode To Caffeine appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

Whatever your preferred form of caffeine is, it has many benefits in moderate amounts. Photo: www.shutterstock.com

Jason Devaney writes about the evolution of coffee in his life.

For years, I didn’t drink caffeine.

Couldn’t do it. A small heart valve defect meant I was relegated to black-colored hot water, also known as decaf coffee.

But it wasn’t always like that. In college I discovered the benefits of drinking coffee in the morning—I craved that jolt it gave me. Especially after a late night. I was living an unhealthy lifestyle, too—eating too much processed junk, drinking too much beer. Coffee would help me wake up for those dreaded 8 a.m. classes.

But then I was put on the decaf diet when my heart started to race and flutter after consuming caffeine. A few years later, I began to lift weights and go for short runs, which made me feel great. I lost some weight and got into better eating habits.

A few years after that I jumped into triathlon, even though I had no clue how to swim or handle a road bike. And I was still on the decaf diet.

But about two years ago, after years of drinking boring decaf coffee purely for the flavor and the routine, I began introducing the real stuff into my mornings. I started with a half-caf coffee before working my way to a full cup of the real stuff. And guess what? No more heart troubles. I’d feel a jolt, but the bad side effects were gone.

RELATED: Fuel Of The Week: Caffeine

Now I’m a coffee-holic. And that is particularly true in my endurance sports life. I can’t go for a morning run or bike ride without a cup. I’ve worked my way from coffee to espresso, which I enjoy more for a variety of reasons: The flavor is intense and gives you a quick jolt without having to drink a standard-sized cup of American-style coffee. When I was in Italy over the summer, a cappuccino became my staple after a run—it contained just the right amount of protein and fat (in the milk) and calories to make me feel better after a run in the heat. And of course, I would throw down a shot of espresso pre-run.

I’ve seen and heard a lot of negative things about drinking caffeine. Some of them are true. Some aren’t.

Does coffee dehydrate you? That’s debatable. But if you stay hydrated with other fluids like plain water, you won’t get dehydrated. Studies have proven that the old adage of caffeine being a diuretic is false.

Are caffeine-induced jitters a bad thing? If you limit yourself to one or two cups a day, your body shouldn’t react like that. If it does, you might want to think about scaling back your intake, drinking weaker coffee or switching to decaf. Also, if you typically add mounds of sugar to your coffee, try adding just one mound. All that sugar will lead to a crash.

Is caffeine addicting? Yes. Caffeine is technically a drug so if you drink it every day for years and years and then one day stop drinking it, you will most likely feel some withdrawal symptoms. To keep this in check, keep your caffeine intake low.

RELATED: Should I Drink Coffee Before My Race?

Numerous studies have been conducted on the benefits of caffeine as it relates to athletic performance, too. Now we have all sorts of nutrition products that contain caffeine, like gels, bars and chews. In a way it makes pre-race fueling easier—you get your calories and caffeine all in one package!

For me, caffeine in the morning has become automatic. When I don’t feel like waking up after a restless sleep, I look forward to enjoying that quick espresso or cappuccino. Or, when I’m traveling, a nice cup of black coffee does the job quite nicely.

So thank you, caffeine, for bringing joy to my mornings. I don’t know what I would do without you.

What’s your favorite form of caffeine? Tweet me at @jason_devaney1.

The post The Everyman: An Ode To Caffeine appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/staff-blog/the-everyman/the-everyman-an-ode-to-caffeine_113942/feed 0
RunSafer: Striking Key Targets on Your Attacker http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/video/runsafer-striking-key-targets-attacker_113976 http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/video/runsafer-striking-key-targets-attacker_113976#comments Tue, 16 Sep 2014 22:33:20 +0000 Competitor.com http://running.competitor.com/?p=113976

If you're face-to-face with an attacker during a run, it's important to know just where he is vulnerable.

The post RunSafer: Striking Key Targets on Your Attacker appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

Knowing the right way to fight back could give you a better chance at escaping.

If you’re face-to-face with an attacker during a run, it’s important to know just where he is vulnerable. This video shows the five targets you should aim for that gives you the best chance to get free and get to safety.

RELATED: RunSafer: How to Escape a Wrist Grip

The post RunSafer: Striking Key Targets on Your Attacker appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/video/runsafer-striking-key-targets-attacker_113976/feed 0
Kastor, Goucher Want Fast Times in Philly http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/news/kastor-goucher-want-fast-times-philly_113966 http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/news/kastor-goucher-want-fast-times-philly_113966#comments Tue, 16 Sep 2014 21:38:24 +0000 Bert Rosenthal http://running.competitor.com/?p=113966

Deena Kastor has high expectations for Rock 'n' Roll Philadelphia this weekend. Photo: PhotoRun.net

The Americans will go against a strong international field at the Rock 'N' Roll Philadelphia Half Marathon.

The post Kastor, Goucher Want Fast Times in Philly appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

Deena Kastor has high expectations for Rock 'n' Roll Philadelphia this weekend. Photo: PhotoRun.net

The Americans will go against a strong international field at the Rock ‘N’ Roll Philadelphia Half Marathon.

PHILADELPHIA—Deena Kastor and Kara Goucher have won numerous races, accolades and honors, and own several records. They will try and add to their haul at the 2014 Rock ‘n’ Roll Philadelphia Half Marathon on Sept. 21.

The task will not be easy. The two American distance stars will face a star-studded field led by Ethiopia’s Worknesh Kidane and Aberu Kebede, Japan’s Tomomi Tanaka and Yuko Shimizu, and Kenya’s Caroline Rotich.

The Philadelphia course, which starts and finishes in front of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, has produced five world records, five American records and the current men’s and women’s U.S. all-comers’ records. Those numbers could be increased this year.

The 41-year-old Kastor owns the American record for the half-marathon (1:07:34) set at London in 2006 and ran the fastest half marathon by an American in the U.S. (1:07:53) at Philadelphia in 2005. She also is the U.S. record holder for the marathon (2:19:36), set the U.S. Masters record for the half marathon (1:11:38) in New York earlier this year and established Masters records for 10 miles (55:13) and 20 kilometers (1:08.18) at Rock ‘n’ Roll Dallas in March.

“Deena has a legitimate chance to beat every non-Master,” Tracy Sundlun, SVP and co-founder of the Rock ‘n’ Roll series, said. “She’ll be going for another record in Philadelphia, chasing both her U.S. and hopefully the world Masters record.”

Kastor is overjoyed to return to Philadelphia.

“With a great summer of training … I am excited to return to Rock ‘n’ Roll Philadelphia,” she said. “This race is home to my fastest half marathon on American soil so I look forward to using the great field assembled so that I can post a fast time.”

The 36-year-old Goucher also has had a storied career. She won a World Championship bronze medal at 10,000 meters in 2007, the first American medal ever in that event; finished third at the 2008 New York City Marathon, the first time in 14 years that an American placed in the top three in that race; and she was No. 1 in the U.S. in the half marathon in 2011.

Sundlun also is delighted to have Goucher in the race.

“She just lights up her fellow competitors and lights up the sport,” Sundlun said.

Goucher is equally excited about her return.

“After a year and a half of frustration and heartache, I am pleased to … return to competitive racing at Rock ‘n’ Roll Philly,” Goucher said. “I have wanted to run this race since I watched (husband) Adam (Goucher) get an Olympic Trials qualifier in 2011. The Rock ‘n’ Roll series has always been great to me and I can’t think of a better place to start my comeback.”

Goucher had been sidelined with a sacral stress fracture. In recent weeks she has shown marked improvement in her fitness and has adjusted her time goals accordingly.

“I’d love to say I’m going out there and running a super fast time, but I have to be realistic of where I’m at,” she recently told ESPN.com. “I think I’m in better shape than I thought I was. We originally had a goal of 71 or 72 minutes, but we’re predicting a little quicker now.”

RELATED: Rejuvenated Goucher Ready to Return to Racing

Goucher will have to be quick to overcome this powerful international field.

Kidane ran her personal best (1:07:36) at Philadelphia in 2011. She placed fourth at the 2004 and 2012 Olympic Games in the 10,000 and has won eight individual medals at the World Cross Country Championships, including one gold.

Kebede has a half-marathon best of 1:07:39 at the 2009 World Half Marathon Championships, where she won the bronze medal. She also has victories at the 2012 Berlin Marathon and 2013 Shanghai Marathon.

The Japanese duo also is very formidable. Tanaka has a PR of 1:09:24 set this year in Yamaguchi and she was fourth at Philadelphia last year. In addition, she set a marathon PR of 2:26:05 at Nagoya in March. Shimizu’s half-marathon PR is 1:09:32 last year at Marugame and she ran her marathon best this year at London.

Rotich established her half-marathon PR of 1:08:52 at New York in 2011. She also has won the 2013 Prague Marathon, was fourth at this year’s Tokyo Marathon and has run 2:23:22 in the marathon.

For the first time in 2014, race weekend in Philadelphia will include two days of running with a Rock ‘n’ Roll 5K event taking place on Saturday and half marathon on Sunday to create a running festival weekend. Both Kastor and Goucher will lead pace groups for the 3.1-mile event as a shakeout. Runners who complete Saturday’s 5K and Sunday’s half marathon will earn the special “Remix Challenge” medal for participating in both events.

Both events will begin at 8 a.m., starting and finishing at Eakins Oval directly in front of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. The half marathon course remains flat and fast beginning on Benjamin Franklin Parkway, surrounded by stunning views of the city skyline, running through the historical Center City, past Independence Hall and along the scenic Schuylkill River. After crossing the finish line, runners will join family and friends to celebrate their accomplishment at the concert headlined by Rusted Root.

The post Kastor, Goucher Want Fast Times in Philly appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/news/kastor-goucher-want-fast-times-philly_113966/feed 0
Destination America: The Ultimate Running Guide http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/features/ultimate-travel-guide-runners_113884 http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/features/ultimate-travel-guide-runners_113884#comments Tue, 16 Sep 2014 18:00:42 +0000 Competitor.com http://running.competitor.com/?p=113884

Santa Barbara is just one of many travel destinations runners enjoy. Photo: Jeff Clark

There's no better way to see America the Beautiful than during a run.

The post Destination America: The Ultimate Running Guide appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

Santa Barbara is just one of many travel destinations runners enjoy. Photo: Jeff Clark

There’s no better way to see America the Beautiful than during a run.

Runners tend to have the personalities of explorers. We love seeing new places during our runs, we sign up for destination races every year, and in some cases, we even plan vacations around the running opportunities that are offered. What better way to see a place for the first time than on a run?

With that in mind, Competitor started a series highlighting different locales that are runner-friendly, complete with routes to run, races to sign up for and even the best spots to eat, drink and shop.

Here’s the list of locations that we’ve hit so far. Bookmark this page, as we’ll be continually adding new places. Safe travels, and don’t forget your running shoes!

Albuquerque, New Mexico – The city’s climate and elevation has attracted professional runners, but there’s plenty for any level of athlete to enjoy.

Ashland, Oregon – Near the Oregon-California border, this small town has great trails, from Lithis Park to the Pacific Crest Trail.

Asheville, North Carolina – The town of 80,000 has been making its own mark as a mountain destination for endurance athletes.

Aspen, Colorado – A summertime favorite, this small ski town 8,000 feet above sea level is filled with paved paths and mountain trails of varying difficulties.

Bend, Oregon – On the eastern flanks of the Cascade Mountains, Bend is a trail running utopia that endurance athletes are falling in love with.

Boulder, Colorado – It is one of the headquarters for elite endurance athletes in the United States, and there are plenty of reasons why.

Flagstaff, Arizona – One of the mildest high-elevation spots in America, this town has a vibrant running community and the races and routes to support it.

Las Vegas, Nevada – The Strip gets all the attention, but venture away from Las Vegas’ calling card and find a great place for runners to explore.

Marin County, California – Just minutes from the hustle and bustle of the Bay Area’s big cities is this quiet county with unforgettable routes and a fantastic running community.

Moab, Utah – The trail running scenery is without peer, and the growing community has led to top-notch races on those unforgettable trails.

North Conway, New Hampshire – A charming, rural New England town with miles of hilly fire roads, trails and more.

Santa Barbara, California – Tucked in between the beaches and the mountains, this Southern California destination is hard to beat for its routes, its races and its weather.

Ulster County, New York – It’s far enough from New York City to get away from civilization and enjoy fantastic running routes at places like Minnewaska State Park.

 

The post Destination America: The Ultimate Running Guide appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/features/ultimate-travel-guide-runners_113884/feed 0
Colorado Man Drops 100 Pounds Through Running http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/news/colorado-man-drops-100-pounds-running_113931 http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/news/colorado-man-drops-100-pounds-running_113931#comments Tue, 16 Sep 2014 17:21:25 +0000 Competitor.com http://running.competitor.com/?p=113931

Yusuke Kirimoto spent a lot of time on the trails of Colorado during his weight-loss journey. Photo: www.shutterstock.com

Yusuke Kirimoto went from 270 pounds to 168 through a diet and exercise regimen that includes running.

The post Colorado Man Drops 100 Pounds Through Running appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

Yusuke Kirimoto spent a lot of time on the trails of Colorado during his weight-loss journey. Photo: www.shutterstock.com

Yusuke Kirimoto went from 270 pounds to 168 through a diet and exercise regimen that includes running.

A Colorado man used running to drop more than 100 pounds off his frame and is now a trimmed-down running and fitness enthusiast.

According to a CNN report, Yusuke Kirimoto’s weight hit 270 pounds in 2010, a heavy burden for his 37-year-old body that stood 5-foot-10. He realized some changes were in order, so he began cutting down on the amount of carbohydrates and sugars in his diet.

Then he started a strength training regimen at the gym, followed by the addition of treadmill runs. One year into his weight-loss journey, Kirimoto was down 81 pounds and heading in the right direction.

Soon after, he discovered the joys of running outside—seeing the picturesque Colorado wilderness, breathing in clean air and the adventures that running on trails brought.

And that’s when things really took off.

Kirimoto ran his first 5K in February 2012 and has since run countless races. He runs with his now 7-year-old daughter on Sundays and the pair completed the Bolder Boulder 10K earlier this year.

Kirimoto is now down to 168 pounds and has no plans to return to his old habits.

“Make [exercise] an exciting adventure,” Kirimoto told CNN. “Everyone is different. Consistency is the key to both weight loss and fitness. You may not see results immediately, but keep at it and you will be rewarded.”

For More: CNN.com

The post Colorado Man Drops 100 Pounds Through Running appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/news/colorado-man-drops-100-pounds-running_113931/feed 0
Pilk’s Points: Small Races Offer Big Rewards http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/staff-blog/pilks-points-small-races-offer-big-rewards_113890 http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/staff-blog/pilks-points-small-races-offer-big-rewards_113890#comments Tue, 16 Sep 2014 16:42:06 +0000 Caitlyn Pilkington http://running.competitor.com/?p=113890

Meeting Clover Stornetta was like meeting a childhood hero and celebrity of dairy products.

A smaller race has a charm to it that's a welcome change of pace.

The post Pilk’s Points: Small Races Offer Big Rewards appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

Meeting Clover Stornetta was like meeting a childhood hero and celebrity of dairy products.

A smaller race has a charm to it that’s a welcome change of pace.

I did my first small(er) race over the weekend in my hometown of Petaluma, Calif. In its fourth year, the Clo-Cow Half Marathon has under 500 participants between the half and 5K—compared to the monstrous road races I’m used to, this was definitely perfect for me: My small-town hometown offering a small-town running event.

As I covered the gorgeous, albeit extremely hilly, hidden back roads of my beloved city, I soaked in some of my favorite things about racing through farms, alongside emus, next to the same people and on completely open roads (although there were probably five total cars who did more cheering than honking at runners). While I do have a special place in my runner heart for big, blown-out road races that cram thousands of people into closed roads, hundreds into 30-plus corrals and dozens into every race photo, this tiny event that actually announced every runner’s name across the line really struck a special nerve—and I’m definitely going back (with a lot more hill prep).

I Saw A Different Part Of My Childhood

Although this is particular to the fact that I was actually born in the Bay Area and raised in Petaluma, it was a surreal, yet calming feeling to finally be able to run a race through a place that I still love to call home. And P-Town definitely would never host a huge race; it was the perfect tribute to small-town living and running.

RELATED: Slow It Down

Less People Means More Interactions

I’ve never felt like I “got to know” the runners around me during races—it was tunnel vision and weaving when necessary. But as I covered those insane 13.1 miles, I felt almost connected to the handful of people that kept trading spots with me; since it went through unclosed farm roads, there were hardly any spectators and almost dead silence (save for the occasional goat). We never spoke, but it was almost like you could hear each other’s thoughts. I still can’t pick a favorite runner though—was it the powerhouse downhill runner that kept passing on the downs while I passed on the ups? Was it the older ginger man who wore split shorts two sizes too small? Or was it the extremely flamboyant gentleman who would heave through his asthma, catch me again, and scream, “You go girl! Pass those boys!”

Logistics Were A Cinch

No exaggeration—we were staying 15 minutes away, left 45 minutes before start time, stopped to use the restroom, parked two blocks from the start and still had time to meander before the gun went off.

The Culture Is Authentic

While I fully support the hype often surrounding huge races that bring teams, charities, groups of friends, celebrities, etc., the running culture at such a tiny half marathon was much different. People were there to run, to hurt, to smile at volunteers, to encourage other people sharing that hurt and to get to know themselves as a runner. For the first time, I studied the 15-ish people I saw throughout the race—and nearly every person ran with an obvious strategy. There were strong hill runners, solid downhill sprinters, patient ones, tangent experts and everything in between. Everyone was running to run because they loved the sport.

RELATED: 10 Signs Running Is The Answer

You Discover (Or Rediscover) Yourself

You know those gag videos about runners and their spastic thoughts during a race? That was me during 13.1 miles—the spectrum of emotions was full and loud in my head. I ran without a watch and without music on a silent course with no clocks, so all I had were my thoughts and how to make it through the course. I (re)discovered that mile 2 is when I have doubts, mile 4 is when I want water, mile 7 is when I’m dropping f-bombs, mile 9 is when I need water, mile 11 is when I get my second wind, and mile 13 is when I realize .1 miles is way longer than you think.

The cowbell medal and my fourth-place age-group finish made the race even sweeter. I even ran into Jared Chan, who finished two minutes ahead of me. Perhaps that’s the real magic of a small-town event: Despite a grueling course on very little training, I still crossed the line with a smile, ready to come back stronger in 2015.

The post Pilk’s Points: Small Races Offer Big Rewards appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/staff-blog/pilks-points-small-races-offer-big-rewards_113890/feed 0
Shoe Of The Week: Salomon Sense Pro http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/shoes-and-gear/shoe-week-salomon-sense-pro_113914 http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/shoes-and-gear/shoe-week-salomon-sense-pro_113914#comments Tue, 16 Sep 2014 16:31:03 +0000 Brian Metzler http://running.competitor.com/?p=113914

The Salomon Sense Pro blends road-shoe flexibility and responsiveness with protection and underfoot feel.

This versatile, do-almost-everything shoe is light, cushioned and responsive. A shoe designed to be versatile enough to cover both trails

The post Shoe Of The Week: Salomon Sense Pro appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

The Salomon Sense Pro blends road-shoe flexibility and responsiveness with protection and underfoot feel.

Salomon Sense ProThis versatile, do-almost-everything shoe is light, cushioned and responsive.

A shoe designed to be versatile enough to cover both trails and roads with equal effectiveness, the Sense Pro is built on a sleek, lightweight package that offers great proprioceptive interaction with the ground and a good blend of lightweight cushion and low-profile outsole lugs. Because it’s meant to be a do-almost-everything shoe, it’s best for runs that mix smooth dirt trails, paved streets, gravel roads, concrete bike paths and some mildly technical terrain. It has just enough protective features to keep minor trail debris from becoming a nuisance, but it’s hefty and shielded enough to tackle really rocky trails too. If you only want to add one versatile shoe to your quiver or your budget requires it, this is a good one to consider. This shoe’s versatility lends itself to racing too; it’s one of the few shoes that could be used for a trail race or a road race. Some testers liked Salomon’s quick-pull laces (several suggested that they were more effective than speed-lacing systems on other shoes) but most said they preferred traditional laces.

This shoe is for you if … you want a versatile shoe for running on a mixture of roads and mild to moderate trails.

Price: $130
Weights: 8.8 oz. (men’s), 7.9 oz. (women’s)
Heel-Toe Offset: 6mm; 20mm (heel), 14mm (forefoot)
Info: www.salomon.com

RELATED: Shoe Of The Week—Brooks PureGrit 3

The post Shoe Of The Week: Salomon Sense Pro appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/shoes-and-gear/shoe-week-salomon-sense-pro_113914/feed 0
Competitor on Demand: The Frog Stretch http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/training/competitor-demand-frog-stretch_113905 http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/training/competitor-demand-frog-stretch_113905#comments Tue, 16 Sep 2014 05:18:41 +0000 Competitor.com http://running.competitor.com/?p=113905

Stretch out your groin muscles after a good speed session with yoga-inspired stretch.

The post Competitor on Demand: The Frog Stretch appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

A good session of speed work will put a strain on your groin muscles. This stretch, inspired by yoga, is a great way to keep your inner thigh muscles stretched out and healthy.

Do this stretch three times for 10-30 seconds each after your workout.

RELATED: Piriformis Stretch to Prevent IT Band Pain

 

The post Competitor on Demand: The Frog Stretch appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/training/competitor-demand-frog-stretch_113905/feed 0
Ryan Hall To Be Coached By Jack Daniels http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/training/ryan-hall-coached-jack-daniels_113891 http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/training/ryan-hall-coached-jack-daniels_113891#comments Tue, 16 Sep 2014 01:07:01 +0000 Mario Fraioli http://running.competitor.com/?p=113891

Can Ryan Hall return to the American record form he had in 2007? Photo: PhotoRun.net

America's fastest marathoner puts an end to his self-coaching experiment.

The post Ryan Hall To Be Coached By Jack Daniels appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

Can Ryan Hall return to the American record form he had in 2007? Photo: PhotoRun.net

America’s fastest marathoner puts an end to his self-coaching experiment. 

On Monday afternoon, Ryan Hall announced on he and his wife Sara’s blog that he is now under the tutelage of legendary coach Jack Daniels, thus ending a near 4-year self-coaching stint during which the 2:04:58 marathoner said he was letting his Christian faith inspire and guide his training and racing decisions.

“I am thrilled to be working with Jack as my coach,” Hall wrote. “It has been a fun ride over the last couple of years being self-coached and I have learned a lot, but I feel like I am back in my old ‘sophomore self’ shoes, looking forward to soak[ing] up everything Jack has to say. Jack has already played an influential role in my development as a runner, as well as [with] hundreds and thousands of others and I am confident he can help me get back to my full potential as a marathon runner. With the Olympic Trials just a year and a half away it’s time to start making progress towards my main goal as an athlete, to return to the Olympics and be at my very best there. This is something that has eluded me the last two Olympics but I am hopeful and expectant for the next years ahead with Jack’s guidance.”

RELATED: Ryan Hall Career Highlights

Hall, who has dealt with a string of nagging injuries and inconsistent racing results over the past three years, ran 2:04:58 to finish fourth at the 2011 Boston Marathon (the fastest time ever run by an American, but it doesn’t qualify as the American record because of the downhill, point-to-point nature of Boston’s course) and finished second to Meb Keflezighi at the 2012 U.S. Olympic Trials in Houston. Since the 2012 Trials, he’s only finished one marathon, placing 20th in 2:17:50 at this past April’s Boston Marathon. While being self-coached, he and wife Sara have led a nomadic existence, mostly bouncing between Flagtaff, Ariz., and Redding, Calif., and even training in Ethiopia this past spring prior to Boston. It is expected Hall will be based in Flagstaff, where both he and Daniels own homes, and continue preparations for a possible fall marathon.

A 2005 Stanford graduate, Hall achieved some of his best successes as a professional under coach Terrance Mahon as a member of the Mammoth Track Club from 2005-2010. In 2007, Hall became the only American ever to break 60 minutes for the half marathon, setting a still-standing American record of 59:43. Later that spring, Hall placed seventh in the London Marathon, running 2:08:24, the fastest marathon debut ever by an American. That November, he dominated the U.S. Olympic Trials at New York City’s Central Park, winning in a Trials record 2:09:02. And the following April, he ran 2:06:17 at the London Marathon, pacing fifth in the second-fastest time ever run by an American and the fastest time ever run by an American-born citizen. After third and fourth place finishes at the Boston Marathon in 2009 and 2010, Hall split from Mahon and left the Mammoth Track Club and has been largely self-coached since, minus a brief stint at the end of 2012 when he briefly worked with famed Italian coach Renato Canova.

Daniels, 81, has worked with a dozens of Olympic athletes over the course of his storied coaching career and authored the best-selling book, Daniels’ Running Formula, now in its third edition. Best known for his collegiate coaching success at SUNY Cortland, where he guided 30 individual Division III NCAA national champions, eight NCAA national team champions and 130 All-Americans over the course of 17 years, Daniels is now in his second year coaching the men’s and women’s cross-country teams at Wells College in Aurora, New York.

The post Ryan Hall To Be Coached By Jack Daniels appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/training/ryan-hall-coached-jack-daniels_113891/feed 0
Jessica Hofheimer: Making Mistakes, Learning Lessons http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/saucony-26-strong/jessica-hofheimer-making-mistakes-learning-lessons_113856 http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/saucony-26-strong/jessica-hofheimer-making-mistakes-learning-lessons_113856#comments Mon, 15 Sep 2014 19:57:00 +0000 Jessica Hofheimer http://running.competitor.com/?p=113856

Jessica Hofheimer has shaved more than two hours off her marathon time in 14 years. Photo: www.shutterstock.com

During her 14 years as a runner, Jessica Hofheimer has learned from her mistakes—which has molded her into a 3:11 marathoner.

The post Jessica Hofheimer: Making Mistakes, Learning Lessons appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

Jessica Hofheimer has shaved more than two hours off her marathon time in 14 years. Photo: www.shutterstock.com

Mistakes in running (and in life) are both inevitable and essential to our success. The little ones and the big ones all add up to teach us something and can make us better, smarter and stronger—if we choose to learn from them. I believe that with all of my heart. It sure doesn’t mean it’s easy, though. We have to be brave and responsible to learn the lessons from our mistakes. We have to own them, to adapt and make changes in order to improve and grow from them.

I have been running marathons for 14 years. I wholeheartedly believe that I would not be the runner that I am today if it were not for all the mistakes I have made and the lessons I learned from them.

In the beginning, I think pretty much everything I did was a mistake. For the first nine or so years of my running, I did so much wrong. The thing is, the biggest mistake that I made during that stretch of my running was that I had no clue that the power to change was within me and my choices all along. Sure, some variables are always out of our control, but I never took accountability for how I handled them or how I prepared myself moving forward. I was full of excuses when things didn’t go my way—the weather, the hills, the side-stitch, the lack of sleep, the nutrition made me feel icky, I just wasn’t “made” to be a good runner. I kept holding onto the same bad habits, training cycle after training cycle. As a result, my marathons and other races were all about the same—I over-trained and under-fueled each and every single time.

It wasn’t until a few years ago that I started to figure things out. The realization that I had the power of choice, and that I could make different choices about how I trained and raced, changed my running dramatically. I became very self-aware and thoughtful about how what I was doing and how I was doing it impacted my runs and my races. I changed my attitude about my failures and began to see them as opportunities for growth, experiences that could teach me how to be better. Now, with each training cycle and race I evaluate what went right and what went wrong and make changes accordingly. It has been very empowering and is the biggest reason why I took my marathon time from 5:21 to 3:11 over the course of the last 14 years.

Attitude is everything when it comes to our mistakes. We can let them crush us and pin us down, paralyzing us and keeping us in a holding pattern of negative thinking and bad habits —or we can stand up tall, grow and learn from them! That is the braver choice, the harder choice, and in my mind … really the only choice if you want to move forward.

For more on the Saucony 26 Strong program, which pairs up 13 coaches with 13 marathon rookies, visit 26Strong.com.

The post Jessica Hofheimer: Making Mistakes, Learning Lessons appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/saucony-26-strong/jessica-hofheimer-making-mistakes-learning-lessons_113856/feed 0
South Dakota Runner, 94, Wins 4 Gold Medals http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/news/south-dakota-runner-94-wins-4-gold-medals_113847 http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/news/south-dakota-runner-94-wins-4-gold-medals_113847#comments Mon, 15 Sep 2014 18:02:21 +0000 Competitor.com http://running.competitor.com/?p=113847

A 94-year-old South Dakota runner is making headlines on the track. Photo: www.shutterstock.com

Harold Bach only started seriously running in his 70s.

The post South Dakota Runner, 94, Wins 4 Gold Medals appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

A 94-year-old South Dakota runner is making headlines on the track. Photo: www.shutterstock.com

Harold Bach only started seriously running in his 70s.

A 94-year-old from South Dakota has a message for runners: Catch me if you can.

Harold Bach recently won four gold medals in his age group at the South Dakota Senior Games in four events: the 50-, 100-, 200- and 400-meter races.

There were not enough runners in his age group to fill the lanes on the track during his races, so meet organizers pitted him against runners in their 80s.

Bach beat them all.

A World War II Army veteran who served in North Africa and Europe, Bach has only been seriously running for 22 years. That means he started at the young age of 72.

He has since collected 157 race wins. His victories in Rapid City, S.D. qualified him for the National Senior Games in Bloomington, Minn., to be held next summer.

Bach holds the 50m world record in the age 90-94 category at 10.05 seconds. He runs 2 miles every day, according to the Bismarck Tribune, but only races sprint-distance events.

He will move up to the next age group category next year when he turns 95.

“You can start any time,” Bach said. “The main thing is getting started. There are a lot of health gains to it.”

For More: Bismarck Tribune

The post South Dakota Runner, 94, Wins 4 Gold Medals appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/news/south-dakota-runner-94-wins-4-gold-medals_113847/feed 0