Competitor.com http://running.competitor.com Your Online Source for Running Sun, 19 Apr 2015 02:01:12 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.0.1 Video: Tracksmith Hosts Elite Boston Marathon Amateurs http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/video/video-tracksmith-hosts-elite-boston-marathon-amateurs_126755 http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/video/video-tracksmith-hosts-elite-boston-marathon-amateurs_126755#comments Sat, 18 Apr 2015 22:45:56 +0000 http://running.competitor.com/?p=126755

Some of the top amateurs in the Boston Marathon field got together at Tracksmith headquarters.

The post Video: Tracksmith Hosts Elite Boston Marathon Amateurs appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

The professional elites get plenty of attention, and rightfully so, but Tracksmith—a brand that focuses on the “amateur spirit” of running—held true to that creed during Boston Marathon weekend by hosting a press conference for elite amateurs. Competitor senior editor Mario Fraioli hosted a panel, and afterward, several of the top-performing amateurs spoke to Competitor about their balance between running and, oftentimes, a full-time job.

RELATED: Competitor’s Complete Boston Marathon Coverage

The post Video: Tracksmith Hosts Elite Boston Marathon Amateurs appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/video/video-tracksmith-hosts-elite-boston-marathon-amateurs_126755/feed 0
Artwork Recreates Iconic Boston Marathon Moments http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/photos/artwork-recreates-iconic-boston-marathon-moments_126647 http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/photos/artwork-recreates-iconic-boston-marathon-moments_126647#comments Sat, 18 Apr 2015 20:56:32 +0000 http://running.competitor.com/?p=126647

The pieces are up for auction to benefit the One Fund Center.

The post Artwork Recreates Iconic Boston Marathon Moments appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

Adidas is teaming up with Percy Fortini-Wright, a Boston graffiti artist, to auction off artwork of famous Boston Marathon moments to raise money for the One Fund Center.

The pieces vary from elite runners to memorable moments. A piece featuring local bartender Chris Laudani shoveling off the Boston Marathon finish line during a blizzard was presented to him recently. Four other works of art are now live on Paddle8, an online auction house for fine art and collectables, from April 17-27. All proceeds support the One Fund Center.

Here’s a look at the artwork that depicts some of the Boston Marathon’s most memorable moments:

 

The post Artwork Recreates Iconic Boston Marathon Moments appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/photos/artwork-recreates-iconic-boston-marathon-moments_126647/feed 0
American-Born Nemec Runs for the Croatian Flag http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/boston-marathon/american-born-nemec-runs-for-the-croatian-flag_126626 http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/boston-marathon/american-born-nemec-runs-for-the-croatian-flag_126626#comments Sat, 18 Apr 2015 20:10:33 +0000 http://running.competitor.com/?p=126626

Lisa Nemec at the 2015 Prague Half Marathon. Photo: PhotoRun.net

Her running career blossomed after moving to Croatia after college.

The post American-Born Nemec Runs for the Croatian Flag appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

Lisa Nemec at the 2015 Prague Half Marathon. Photo: PhotoRun.net

Edward Everett Hale wrote a short story entitled “The Man Without a Country,” but Lisa Nemec might as well be known as the marathoner with two.

Although she lives in Zagreb, Croatia and has represented that country in interational competition for half a decade, she was born and raised 100 miles south of Boston in Waterbury, Conn., where she began her running career as a high school freshman. After continuing her competitive career at Columbia University in New York, she moved to Croatia, her father’s homeland to teach English in a private school. Joining a track club in Zagreb restarted her athletic improvement, and also fostered a move to longer distances. Her first try at the marathon distance, in Berlin in 2010, resulted in a national record 2:33:42.

She’s since run seven more marathons, including the 2011 IAAF World Championships and the London Olympics a year later, where she became the first runner to represent Croatia in the marathon. The following year she sliced a huge chunk off her personal and national record in winning the Zurich Marathon in 2:25:44. Last year she returned to Zurich for the European Championships and ran 2:28:36 on a different course to place fourth, then did a quick turnaround and finished second at the Honolulu Marathon in December.

“Last year the main focus was the Euro champs,” she said. “But I wanted to run one more marathon and Honolulu was the latest one on the schedule. I expected it to be really hot but it was rainy and windy.”

Nemec spent most of the winter training in southern Portugal, then tested her fitness at the Prague Half Marathon last month. “My shape was pretty good and I was planning to break 69 minutes,” she said “I think I was too excited and started out too fast and after 5K my legs started to cramp up a little. I’m a little disappointed but in the long run it might be good to make me be a little calm at the start here.

“In New York City [where she finished 12th two years ago] my strategy was to start out and stay with the lead group,” Nemec said. “But they started really slow and I think if I’d run my own pace I would have run better. I think I learned from that experience that you can’t always depend on the competition. The competition is always strong at these big races but you know how you’ve trained and you know what type of race is best for you so you can’t always let other people dictate what you do.”

Unlike many elite entrants who have done extensive recon and training on the Boston course, Nemec hasn’t even seen the iconic route from Hopkinton to Back Bay, but she isn’t fazed by that potential lack of firsthand knowledge. “The Euro champs course was on a pretty hilly 10K loop with a 1K steep uphill followed by a steep 1K downhill,” she said

“We started preparing for that last January so I’ve had over a year of training on up and downhills. I’m a pretty good uphill runner and been doing a lot of training on downhills, so hopefully I’ll be able to handle the Boston course. I think I have to be really careful the first miles—my main goal in the beginning is not to go out too fast. I think I’ll stay behind a little then try to catch up. If it goes out slow then I’ll just run my pace although I have a feeling it’s not going to start out slow.”

Although a second World Champs run, scheduled for Beijing this August, is a possibility for Nemec, nothing is definite yet.

“This is the first time I’ve been running a marathon with no plans for the future,” she said. “There’s World Champs but we decided that Boston is the main focus this year. We’ll see how much time I need to recover after—it will probably beat up my legs so I think maybe I’ll need more rest than normal. If I recover fast enough and can have a long enough buildup I may go to Beijing but we just don’t want to rush into anything. When I ran Honolulu the buildup was real short and the whole time I felt like I was behind and playing catch-up—I don’t think it’s smart to do that very often.”

While her Honolulu prep might have been hurried, Nemec’s Boston buildup has gone exactly as planned, with all her workouts run at a faster pace for the same effort than in the past. “This is actually the most confident I’ve ever been going into a marathon,” she said. “I don’t know if it’s because I’m really prepared or because I’m more experienced and know what to expect. Normally when I go into a race I’ll look at my training log and that gives me confidence but there’s always this voice in the back of my head saying ‘it’s still the marathon’ but this is the first time I don’t have that feeling of second guessing. I guess we’ll see on Monday.”

RELATED: Competitor’s Complete Boston Marathon Coverage

The post American-Born Nemec Runs for the Croatian Flag appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/boston-marathon/american-born-nemec-runs-for-the-croatian-flag_126626/feed 0
Photos: 2015 B.A.A. Invitational Mile http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/photos/photos-2015-b-a-a-invitational-mile_126730 http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/photos/photos-2015-b-a-a-invitational-mile_126730#comments Sat, 18 Apr 2015 18:27:35 +0000 http://running.competitor.com/?p=126730

A fast race and spectator-friendly course made for a memorable day.

The post Photos: 2015 B.A.A. Invitational Mile appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

A pair of Ethiopians surged ahead of the field and won their respective races at the B.A.A. Invitational Mile. The spectator-friendly course made for a rocking environment, which was captured in these photos by Scott Draper:

RELATED: Ethiopans Sweep B.A.A. Invitational Mile

The post Photos: 2015 B.A.A. Invitational Mile appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/photos/photos-2015-b-a-a-invitational-mile_126730/feed 0
Ethiopians Sweep 2015 B.A.A. Invitational Mile http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/news/ethiopians-sweep-2015-b-a-a-invitational-mile_126723 http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/news/ethiopians-sweep-2015-b-a-a-invitational-mile_126723#comments Sat, 18 Apr 2015 18:07:15 +0000 http://running.competitor.com/?p=126723

Photo: Jane Monti/Race Results Weekly

Dawit Seyaum set the event record in the win.

The post Ethiopians Sweep 2015 B.A.A. Invitational Mile appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

Photo: Jane Monti/Race Results Weekly

(c) 2015 Race Results Weekly, all rights reserved. Used with permission.

BOSTON —Athletes from Ethiopia took the top spots in today’s seventh annual BAA Invitational Mile on the streets of Boston’s Back Bay neighborhood. Dejen Gebremeskel and Dawit Seyaum broke the blue Boston Athletic Association finish tapes on Boylston Street just a few meters from the Boston Marathon finish line in 4:04.1 and 4:35.4, respectively. Seyaum’s time was an event record.

Gebremeskel, the 2012 Olympic 5000m silver medalist, decided from the starter’s gun that a hard early pace was the best route to victory. After the first of three circuits, he had a small lead on Britain’s Chris O’Hare and America’s Duncan Phillips, but expanded his lead to two seconds by the end of the second lap. In the final circuit, Gebremeskel overwhelmed the field, leaving O’Hare nearly three seconds behind by the finish.

“He’s a class act,” said O’Hare, the former University of Tulsa star who was clocked today in 4:07.0. “I was a little bit disappointed in the way I executed the race today, but that’s what this is for.”

Frezer Legesse, who ran for the University of Oklahoma during his collegiate career, took third in 4:08.1.

Seyaum employed a different strategy than her male compatriot. She chose to follow the early pace set by three-time event champion Morgan Uceny, then she took the lead on the second circuit, sensing it was time to pick up the pace.

“I decided while I was racing I thought maybe it was better for me to push,” Seyaum told reporters through a translator.

In the final lap, Seyaum—who was running in her first-ever road mile—put the race away. Leading out of the final bend before the finish, she ran unfettered to the finish line, handily beating Anna Willard’s 2009 event record of 4:38.6. Heather Kampf caught Uceny inside of the final 20 meters to take second in 4:37.0 to Uceny’s 4:37.7.

“This is my spot,” Kampf recalled telling herself as she prepared to pass Uceny. “I want to get it.”

For Uceny, the race gave her a good idea where her fitness was prior to opening our outdoor track season.

“I was really happy with the race until the final 100 meters,” she said. She added: “I think the monkey really got on my back.”

Both Gebremeskel and Seyaum won $3000 in prize money.

RELATED: Photos: 2015 B.A.A. Invitational Mile

The post Ethiopians Sweep 2015 B.A.A. Invitational Mile appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/news/ethiopians-sweep-2015-b-a-a-invitational-mile_126723/feed 0
Video: Molly Huddle, Ben True On Their Record-Setting B.A.A. 5K http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/video/video-molly-huddle-ben-true-on-their-record-setting-b-a-a-5k_126716 http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/video/video-molly-huddle-ben-true-on-their-record-setting-b-a-a-5k_126716#comments Sat, 18 Apr 2015 17:35:10 +0000 http://running.competitor.com/?p=126716

The new American record holders discuss their race strategy.

The post Video: Molly Huddle, Ben True On Their Record-Setting B.A.A. 5K appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

Following their record-setting performances at the B.A.A. 5K, Molly Huddle and Ben True met with the media to go over their performance and explain what they were anticipating as the race unfolded.

RELATED: Photos: 2015 B.A.A. 5K

The post Video: Molly Huddle, Ben True On Their Record-Setting B.A.A. 5K appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/video/video-molly-huddle-ben-true-on-their-record-setting-b-a-a-5k_126716/feed 0
Photos: 2015 B.A.A. 5K http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/photos/photos-2015-b-a-a-5k_126696 http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/photos/photos-2015-b-a-a-5k_126696#comments Sat, 18 Apr 2015 15:06:26 +0000 http://running.competitor.com/?p=126696

A record-smashing race on a beautiful Boston morning.

The post Photos: 2015 B.A.A. 5K appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

It was a record-smashing day Saturday morning in Boston, as Americans Molly Huddle and Ben True not only won the B.A.A. 5K, but set American 5K road records.

RELATED: American Records Fall at B.A.A. 5K

Here are images from the race, taken by Scott Draper.

The post Photos: 2015 B.A.A. 5K appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/photos/photos-2015-b-a-a-5k_126696/feed 0
American Records Fall at the B.A.A. 5K http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/boston-marathon/american-records-fall-at-the-b-a-a-5k_126689 http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/boston-marathon/american-records-fall-at-the-b-a-a-5k_126689#comments Sat, 18 Apr 2015 14:31:32 +0000 http://running.competitor.com/?p=126689

Molly Huddle (left) and Ben True both set American records at the B.A.A. 5K (Photos: PhotoRun.net)

Molly Huddle now owns the American 5,000m record on both the track and the road.

The post American Records Fall at the B.A.A. 5K appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

Molly Huddle (left) and Ben True both set American records at the B.A.A. 5K (Photos: PhotoRun.net)

(c) 2015 Race Results Weekly, all rights reserved. Used with permission.

The American records for the 5K on the road came crashing down here this morning when Ben True and Molly Huddle won the seventh annual B.A.A. 5K in 13:22 and 14:50, respectively. In exciting sprint finishes on a gorgeous Spring day, they surpassed the previous marks of 13:24 (Marc Davis, 1996) and 14:54 (Deena Kastor, 2002), both set at the Carlsbad 5000 in California.

True, 26, of Hannover, N.H., overcame an international field the Dartmouth College grad called “pretty stacked” at yesterday’s news conference.  He ran about four meters adrift of the early leader, Kenya’s Philip Langat, who went through the first mile alone in 4:19.  True stayed with Kenya’s Stephen Sambu and Daniel Salel and fellow American Girma Mecheso in the chase pack as the race went on the “out leg” on Commonwealth Avenue.

RELATED: Photos: B.A.A. 5K

Just past the 2K point, Langat drifted back to the chase pack, and True started to work with Sambu to control the race.

“Sambu and I worked really well together from about 2K on,” True said in his post-race interview.  “We were really shoulder to shoulder and pushed that whole last mile.”

As the men’s leaders went through Massachusetts Avenue underpass for the second time, the mass participation athletes were running on the other side of the roadway in the opposite direction.  True really felt the home team advantage as people were shouting his name.

“It was great being out here,” a smiling True told reporters.  “The entire loop of the course my name was being cheered the entire time.  I kind of felt bad for Sambu.”

After turning right on Hereford Street, the lead pack went through two miles in 8:44.  Mecheso was the first to drop back, setting up a final-mile battle between True and Sambu.  The pair made the final left turn onto Charles Street for the final sprint together, and they were neck-and-neck.  True was running for the win, but when he saw the finish clock he felt a further jolt to up his tempo.

“Coming around the last corner, he had the inside lane and I had the outside lane,” True recounted.  “So he got a nice little jump on me.  I was a little afraid I wasn’t going to be able to reel him back in.”

But he did.  With about 150 meters to go, True drew even with Sambu and 50 meters from the finish surged into the lead to get the victory.  Sambu was timed in 13:23, just one second behind True; Salel got third in 13:27.

Organizers changed the certified loop course from last year and claimed it was slightly faster.  True agreed.

“I knew since last year that this course was fast,” explained True. “They said that the course this year was supposed to be a little faster from last year’s.  I figured I might be able to run a little faster.”

Huddle, 30, from Providence, R.I., ran a similar race to True’s.  She ran most of the race tucked in the pack, but was pushed by Ethiopia’s Sentayehu Ejigu and Mamitu Daska as they approached the finish.  The African pair finished one and two seconds, respectively, behind the American who said, like last year here, she was primarily concerned with securing the victory.

“Yeah, I was running for the win,” said Huddle who had painted her fingernails the yellow and blue colors of the Boston Athletic Association, the organizers of today’s race.  “But when I saw how fast it was through the mile and two-mile, even when I was back in fifth, I knew if I maintained that the record would be really close.”

Huddle showed impressive speed in her final kick, especially since her last race was at more than four times the distance at the NYC Half on March 15, where she ran a personal best 1:08:31.  She now holds the American records at both 5000m on the track (14:44.76) and 5K on the road (14:50).

“It was in the very back of my mind,” Huddle said of the record.  “I had to go mile-by-mile today.  I was feeling a bit rough, but I knew if I was going to win it was going to be from the back like last year.  So, I just hoped for the best.”

Huddle and True enjoyed generous paydays here.  Each won $7,500 for their victories, plus $5,000 event record bonuses.

Previous American record holder Marc Davis, who works for the Boston Athletic Association, watched today’s race.  He was pleased that it was True who got his record, but said that he might reflect on it for a few minutes tonight.

“That’s what scotch is for,” he quipped.

RELATED: 7 Must-Do 5Ks in the United States

The post American Records Fall at the B.A.A. 5K appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/boston-marathon/american-records-fall-at-the-b-a-a-5k_126689/feed 0
Tegenkamp Eyeing Boston Success After Training Adjustments http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/boston-marathon/tegenkamp-eyeing-boston-success-after-training-adjustments_126620 http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/boston-marathon/tegenkamp-eyeing-boston-success-after-training-adjustments_126620#comments Sat, 18 Apr 2015 04:50:01 +0000 http://running.competitor.com/?p=126620

Tegenkamp at the 2015 NYC Half. Photo: PhotoRun.net

For his second marathon, the former track star is taking a completely new approach to racing.

The post Tegenkamp Eyeing Boston Success After Training Adjustments appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

Tegenkamp at the 2015 NYC Half. Photo: PhotoRun.net

For most of his career, Matt Tegenkamp has been one of America’s best track and cross country runners, winning national titles at 3,000m and 5,000m, running in three world championship, making two Olympic teams and setting an American record (8:07.07) for 2 miles outdoors.

But a few years ago the Wisconsin grad began dabbling in road races, winning two national titles at 20K and finally debuting in the marathon at Chicago in 2013, placing a respectable 10th in 2:12:28. Now he’s cementing his move to the macadam by running his second 26-miler over America’s iconic race in Boston, a move that’s perhaps a little surprising since he didn’t make the decision to run here until mid-February.

RELATED: Boston Marathon Sticks to Traditional Racing—No Pacemakers

“At the turn of the year Jerry [Schumacher, Tegenkamp’s coach] sat down with everybody and said ‘Regardless of what our focus is going to be late spring early summer, we need to take this time to put the body through a marathon cycle,’” Tegenkamp said.

That meant more volume and longer runs, a noticeable difference from the Chicago buildup, which Tegenkamp referred to as the “Clif Notes” version of marathon prep. “Leading into Chicago it was more like training for 18 to 20 miles,” he said.

“It was like ‘We’ll get you to 20 miles and then it will be kind of a coin flip to see how you do.’ I was definitely fit in Chicago, no doubt about it, but the marathon is like 60 percent fitness and 40 percent fueling and shit can happen.”

What happened was that Tegenkamp didn’t get the nutrients he needed and wound up hitting the wall the last stretch of the race. “It was a little chaotic going through the water stations,” he recalled. “One stop my bottle got knocked over. By the time I got to 35K I was so screwed I was totally depleted, seeing stars. I was afraid that taking fuel constantly throughout the race was at some point going to jack my stomach up and what it actually showed was I needed to take in way more. So this buildup, we incorporated that into my training.”

Tegenkamp is also adjusting to the different mindset of planning a marathon training segment. “The way the marathon process works, you have to announce yourself so early you’ve got to line everything up to match what you’ve said you’re going to do. It’s not the way I’ve ever operated my career; I thought about getting the fitness first then lining up the races.”

Tegenkamp certainly believes he has the fitness to do well in Boston on Monday. “My training is no different than what Shalane’s [Flanagan] has been in terms of the general philosophy,” the Lee’s Summit, Mo., native said. “I think Jerry five years ago was a young coach in the marathon but now he’s confident and we’re confident coming in and executing on race day.”

RELATED: Photos: 2015 Boston Marathon Press Conferences

To boost that probability Tegenkamp did longer workouts and higher mileage this buildup than he’s ever done, including long runs of 2 1/2 hours in duration. The speed and strength components came from tempo runs and repeats at all distances. “The general philosophy was going from race pace to sub-race pace, to get used to the surging and changes in terrain on the course” he said.

To familiarize himself with Boston’s tricky topography Tegenkamp came in three weeks ago to run the course. “I did 16 miles from 6 to 22 on the course, broken down into four 4-mile tempos just to get a feel for it,” he said. “The day before I ran the first 8 in the morning then in the afternoon ran the last little bit to see everything. I got a really good feel for what the course is going to be like.”

One thing he couldn’t simulate on those recon runs was the cheering crowds that figure to line course on Patriots’ Day.

“Boston is absolutely all about the atmosphere,” he said. “I have to keep telling myself ‘patience’ 1,000 times. I don’t want to get caught up and use the adrenaline here in a negative way that winds up screwing me late in the race, but want to enjoy being part of one of the spectacles of the sport.

“If everybody goes out hard it will be the hardest thing for me to do, but I need to approach Monday very differently than what I have ever done on the track or any previous road race. I’d like to get through 10K not even realizing I’ve run it then settle in and grind it out for a while, then get ready to work at the end of the race. If I can run some guys down over those last miles, it will be a good day.”

The post Tegenkamp Eyeing Boston Success After Training Adjustments appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/boston-marathon/tegenkamp-eyeing-boston-success-after-training-adjustments_126620/feed 0
Photos: Scenes From the 2015 Boston Marathon Expo http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/photos/photos-scenes-from-the-2015-boston-marathon-expo_126674 http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/photos/photos-scenes-from-the-2015-boston-marathon-expo_126674#comments Sat, 18 Apr 2015 01:53:16 +0000 http://running.competitor.com/?p=126674

The Boston Marathon Expo opened up to thousands of visitors.

The post Photos: Scenes From the 2015 Boston Marathon Expo appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

The Hynes Convention Center in Boston was rocking on Friday, as the John Hancock Sports and Fitness Expo opened and welcomed thousands of runners arriving into the city for Monday’s Boston Marathon.

RELATED: Photos: 2015 Boston Marathon Press Conferences

Here are scenes from the expo, as captured by Scott Draper:

The post Photos: Scenes From the 2015 Boston Marathon Expo appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/photos/photos-scenes-from-the-2015-boston-marathon-expo_126674/feed 0
Fernando Cabada Aiming For A Boston Breakthrough http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/boston-marathon/fernando-cabada-aiming-for-a-boston-breakthrough_126670 http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/boston-marathon/fernando-cabada-aiming-for-a-boston-breakthrough_126670#comments Sat, 18 Apr 2015 00:00:47 +0000 http://running.competitor.com/?p=126670

Cabada on his way to victory at the Rock 'n' Roll Half Marathon San Francisco last month. Photo: PhotoRun.net

The 32-year-old is feeling relaxed and confident heading into his second Boston Marathon.

The post Fernando Cabada Aiming For A Boston Breakthrough appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

Cabada on his way to victory at the Rock 'n' Roll Half Marathon San Francisco last month. Photo: PhotoRun.net

The 32-year-old is feeling relaxed and confident heading into his second Boston Marathon.

Anxiety is beginning to take its toll on a barbate Fernando Cabada ahead of Monday’s Boston Marathon.

“I think the thing I’m going to be stressing about the whole weekend is if I should keep the beard or not,” quipped Cabada at Friday’s elite athlete press conference. “I might need to keep it because I’m going to have to be like an animal out there on the course.”

Cabada started growing the beard about two months ago and, fearing that shaving it might lead to a Samson-like demise before his biggest race of the year, he’s left it alone since—and with good reason.

The 32-year-old Newton-sponsored athlete from Fresno, Calif., has quietly posted a string of solid results so far in 2015. In February, he placed fourth at the Gasparilla Half Marathon in 1:03:59 and on March 15, he finished 14th amongst a highly competitive field at NYC Half, running 1:03:23 in windy conditions. Two weeks after racing in the Big Apple, Cabada used the hilly Rock ’n’ Roll Half Marathon San Francisco as his final long tuneup race for Boston and won easily in a course-record 1:06:25. A week later he raced 10,000m on the track at Stanford, clocking a swift 28:32, only 7 seconds off his personal best. Logging seven 100-plus mile weeks in the 12 weeks leading up to Monday’s race, Cabada feels he’s fitter than he’s ever been coming into his ninth year as a professional athlete.

“I’ve kind of wanted to do it Rocky style,” Cabada said of his approach to training and racing this spring. “I’ve got this big race coming up and I’ve been very disciplined, very focused.”

PHOTOS: American Elites Talk At 2015 Boston Marathon Press Conferences

Over the past 16 months, Cabada has gotten his career—and his life—back on track, kicking off 2014 with a 1:02:00 personal best in the half marathon and finishing the year with a marathon PB of 2:11:36 at Berlin. After bouncing between Boulder, Colo., and Big Bear, Calif., Cabada moved back to his hometown of Fresno last year and reunited with his former coach, Brad Hudson, at the start of 2015. He says he feels more grounded, focused and motivated than ever before.

“It’s been great to go back to where it all started,” Cabada says of the move back to the Central Valley, “and it’s reminded me why I even got started in the first place. It feels really great to do my best to serve as a role model and help inspire the next generation to do positive things and not set so many limits.”

RELATED: Fernando Cabada Is On The Rise Again

One of those people Cabada has inspired is his cousin, Chris Velez, an organic farmer who lives in nearby in Auberry, Calif. Velez took up running a couple years ago after watching his cousin compete and, with Cabada’s help, went from barely being able to run for 10 minutes to clocking a 1:37:44 half marathon last month in San Francisco. Cabada says it’s been inspiring to witness the 39-year-old Velez transform himself into a totally different person, and athlete.

“[Running] has helped him become a better husband and a better father,” says Cabada, who also credits running for helping him turn his own life around. “He’s so inspired and eager to learn and improve. He’s like a freshman trying to make varsity. It’s a big motivation for me.”

Cabada will take that motivation—along with the momentum of his recent success—to the starting line of his second Boston Marathon on Monday, where he’ll be part of a strong American lineup along with Meb Keflezighi, Dathan Ritzenhein, Nick Arciniaga, Matt Tegenkamp, Jeffrey Eggleston and others. He finished a disappointing 16th in his first go at Boston in 2013, running 2:18:23, but feels relaxed, confident and ready for a beard-powered breakthrough heading into this year’s race.

“I’m more prepared, more experienced and know what to expect,” Cabada says. “I’m really excited to be here and I’m feeling good.”

The post Fernando Cabada Aiming For A Boston Breakthrough appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/boston-marathon/fernando-cabada-aiming-for-a-boston-breakthrough_126670/feed 0
Video: American Elites Talk at 2015 Boston Marathon Press Conferences http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/video/video-american-elites-talk-at-2015-boston-marathon-press-conferences_126660 http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/video/video-american-elites-talk-at-2015-boston-marathon-press-conferences_126660#comments Fri, 17 Apr 2015 23:08:57 +0000 http://running.competitor.com/?p=126660

See how the top Americans are feeling just a couple days out.

The post Video: American Elites Talk at 2015 Boston Marathon Press Conferences appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

See what America’s top runners, including Meb Keflezighi, Shalane Flanagan, Dathan Ritzenhein, Desiree Linden and Jeffrey Eggleston had to say in the days leading up to the 2015 Boston Marathon.

RELATED: Competitor’s Complete Boston Marathon Coverage 

 


The post Video: American Elites Talk at 2015 Boston Marathon Press Conferences appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/video/video-american-elites-talk-at-2015-boston-marathon-press-conferences_126660/feed 0
Boston Marathon Sticks to Traditional Racing—No Pacemakers http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/boston-marathon/boston-marathon-sticks-to-traditional-racing-no-pacemakers_126642 http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/boston-marathon/boston-marathon-sticks-to-traditional-racing-no-pacemakers_126642#comments Fri, 17 Apr 2015 21:42:14 +0000 http://running.competitor.com/?p=126642

Shalane Flanagan set the pace at last year's Boston Marathon all by herself. Photo: PhotoRun.net

As races seek faster and faster times, the Boston Marathon clings tight to its roots.

The post Boston Marathon Sticks to Traditional Racing—No Pacemakers appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

Shalane Flanagan set the pace at last year's Boston Marathon all by herself. Photo: PhotoRun.net

(c) 2015 Race Results Weekly, all rights reserved. Used with permission.

BOSTON — Among the impressive elite field of 20 men and 14 women recruited by the staff of John Hancock Financial for Monday’s 119th Boston Marathon here, there is one kind of athlete observers won’t see: pacemakers.

The Boston Marathon has shrugged off the tyranny of time.

Like the other Abbott World Marathon Majors marathons at the Olympic Games, World Championships and New York City, Boston is held under championships conditions without the benefit of pacemakers—athletes contracted to run a prescribed pace for only a portion of the race before dropping out.  Pacemakers have become ubiquitous at modern marathons as more and more race organizers desire faster winning times, national and world records, and the media and fan attention that they might bring.

For marathon athletes, running a race with pacemakers is vastly different than running under championships conditions which require finely honed racing skills—not just the ability to run fast.

“My only paced race was Berlin and you’re right: it’s totally different,” the fastest American woman entered here, Shalane Flanagan, told Race Results Weekly in an interview.  “I went in and I didn’t have to think.  I didn’t have to use my brain.  I literally just went in, locked in to my pacesetters, and just hung on for this train ride as long as I could.”

In that race last September, Flanagan was trying to break Deena Kastor’s absolute American record of 2:19:36.  She was on schedule through the first half (1:09:38), but faded in the final kilometers to finish in a career best 2:21:14.  She found the experience satisfying, but said she relishes the traditional head-to-head racing featured in Boston.

“I will say I enjoy, kind of like this match-up, like a boxing fight, when you come to an unpaced race,” Flanagan, 33, continued.  “It’s more exciting for the fans, and I think it is more exciting as a competitor.  You have to come out, and there is strategizing, there’s thinking.  It’s a lot more exhausting.  But, overall, I think it yields a much more entertaining race.”

RELATED: For Shalane Flanagan, the Boston Marathon Means Everything

In last year’s Boston Marathon, Flanagan ran aggressively, leading much of the race before fading to finish seventh in 2:22:02, the fastest-ever performance by an American woman in Boston.  Flanagan, who went through the first half in 1:09:27, said she was testing the other athletes and trying to win from the front.

“I was hoping to steal the race the way (men’s winner) Meb (Keflezighi) did,” Flanagan said of her strategy at Boston last year.  “I was hoping to get away.  I was hoping they would think, ‘this girl is crazy, let her go.’  I was hoping to build a really big lead and steal the race.  However, they did not give me an inch.  I maybe should have midway or part of the way should have tucked in at some point.  But, I felt like, you know what? I started the race this way, and I’m stubborn, and I’m going to run 2:22.  Maybe that’s good enough.”

While not openly resenting the rise of pacemaking, four-time Boston and New York City Marathon champion Bill Rodgers, feels that it has dulled the racing senses of current athletes and has done little to improve the appeal of the sport.

“I don’t think it’s a lost art but, obviously, some of the big races, flatter races that are very time-conscious are pushing the pacers,” Rodgers said in an interview here today.  “I don’t mind the pacers, but I think that real marathoning would not include the pacers because what really counts is not your time, but your victory.”

He continued: “All records fall, but your victories are forever.”

Rodgers, now 67, said that he had never run in a marathon with pacesetters.

“There were no pacemakers,” Rodgers said shaking his head and smiling.  “We didn’t even have watches.”

Like Rodgers, Ethiopian Gebre Gebremariam—who won the TCS New York City Marathon in 2010 and has racked up four Abbott World Marathon Majors podium finishes—has never run a marathon with pacemakers, a rarity in the modern era.  He relishes the championships format, he said.

“When you see the races with pacemakers, you can run one speed and you have to perform one thing,” Gebremariam explained in an interview.  “But Boston and New York, they haven’t pacemakers, you have to run five, six races within one race.  You have to use your mentality when you run in such kind of races.  It’s a huge difference.”

Kevin Hanson, who coaches the No. 2 American woman in the race, Desi Linden, said that the sport needs to get back to emphasizing head-to-head racing, and that chasing fast times has hurt, rather than helped, marathon racing.

“I think that the chasing of world records in so many of the major marathons has hurt racing itself because there is only one goal,” Hanson told Race Results Weekly.  “You see people disappointed nowadays with a ‘lousy’ 2:04:30, or something like that.”

He continued: “Seeing people race head-to-head means way more.”

The post Boston Marathon Sticks to Traditional Racing—No Pacemakers appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/boston-marathon/boston-marathon-sticks-to-traditional-racing-no-pacemakers_126642/feed 0
The Boston Marathon Weather Obsession http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/photos/the-boston-marathon-weather-obsession_126631 http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/photos/the-boston-marathon-weather-obsession_126631#comments Fri, 17 Apr 2015 21:05:14 +0000 http://running.competitor.com/?p=126631

Weather is always on the mind of Boston Marathon runners, and with good reason.

The post The Boston Marathon Weather Obsession appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

What’s among the most important things on the minds of Boston Marathon entrants as race day approaches?

Easy—the weather.

Why the Obsession With Weather?

Because Boston’s race day weather has proven to be anything but predictable.  The runner who’s been training for months to hopefully have a terrific race in perfect weather conditions may see those hopes upended once they reach the starting line in Hopkinton.

Our analysis of weather and Boston Marathon average finish times over the last 15 years illustrates how wildly the range of temperatures and conditions can fluctuate during the race. (See below).

And the fluctuations in race day often were unforeseen on the previous evening’s cable TV weather forecast.

How much does weather impact Boston Marathon finish times?

Our analysis of average temperatures and finish times from 1999 to 2014 shows a pattern suggesting temperatures in the low to mid 40s will lead to finish times at or below the 15-year average of 51 degrees and a 3:51 finish.

But as temperatures trend progressively higher, so do the finish times.

What’s Your Best Race Strategy When The Weather Changes?

The best advice, I’d say, is psychological. You’ve trained for months, you’re in peak condition, it’s an incredible race experience—you’ve simply got to push conditions out of your mind.

Others around you may suffer or complain if conditions get bad, but don’t let them convince you to give in to conditions you didn’t welcome.

Despite the weather, give it all you’ve got. Never settle. Drive yourself to the finish line with undeniable determination and passion. Have the race of your life, weather or not (pun intended).

Conditions will change. Your race doesn’t have to. Be the one who defies the weather and have the race of your life. Good luck out there.

The post The Boston Marathon Weather Obsession appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/photos/the-boston-marathon-weather-obsession_126631/feed 0
Amy Cragg Hoping For A Memorable Boston Debut http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/boston-marathon/amy-cragg-hoping-for-a-smooth-landing-in-boston_126605 http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/boston-marathon/amy-cragg-hoping-for-a-smooth-landing-in-boston_126605#comments Fri, 17 Apr 2015 18:57:14 +0000 http://running.competitor.com/?p=126605

Amy Cragg will make her Boston debut on Monday. Photo: Scott Draper | Competitor

The 31-year-old comes into this year's Boston Marathon riding a wave of momentum after scratching from last year's race.

The post Amy Cragg Hoping For A Memorable Boston Debut appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

Amy Cragg will make her Boston debut on Monday. Photo: Scott Draper | Competitor

The 31-year-old comes into this year’s Boston Marathon riding a wave of momentum after scratching from last year’s race.

After experiencing an extended patch of turbulence following her 11th place finish in the 10,000m at 2012 Olympic Games, Amy Cragg is happy to be riding smooth air again.

Cragg, formerly Amy Hastings, will make her Boston Marathon debut on Monday. The Brooks-sponsored athlete, who married Irish Olympian Alistair Cragg last fall, scratched a couple weeks before the 2014 race, saying that her training wasn’t where it needed to be in order to be competitive. That disappointing decision followed a rough go at the 2013 New York City Marathon just five months before, where she gutted out a 2:42:50 finish—well off the 2:27:03 personal best she set in her debut at the 2011 L.A. Marathon.

But Cragg, who lives in nearby Providence and is coached by Ray Treacy, the Providence College cross country and track coach who also mentors New Zealand Olympian Kim Smith and American 5,000m record holder Molly Huddle, has bounced back in a big way over the past 12 months. She got started at the Peachtree Road Race in July, running 32:16 to capture the national 10K title, and followed that up by matching her marathon personal best with a fifth-place finish at the Chicago Marathon in October.

“This is my second race in a four-part plan,” Cragg says of Monday’s Boston Marathon. “Chicago was to get back on track. The next three races—Boston, the Olympic Trials and hopefully the Olympic Games—the goal is to improve a little bit in each race. If I can do that, I think I can make an Olympic team and be really competitive on the international level at the Olympics. If I improve, even if it’s not necessarily a faster time or better place, but I know it’s my best race so far, I’ll be really happy.”

RELATED: Competitor’s 2015 Boston Marathon Coverage

Coming into Boston, Cragg’s 2014 momentum continues to pick up steam. The 31-year-old Arizona State graduate kicked off her year with a 1:12:04 win at the P.F. Changs Rock ’n’ Roll Arizona Half Marathon in January, and then added another national title to her impressive resume last month at the Gate River 15K in Jacksonville, topping U.S. cross-country champion Laura Thweatt by 32 seconds.

“Her Boston buildup has gone smoothly because she’s been able to preempt any hiccups,” her husband says. “She’s a totally different athlete than she was a year ago.”

Since returning to Providence in March from a spring training stint in Arizona, Cragg has made six or seven trips to the Boston area to preview various sections of the course, familiarizing herself with every undulation, turn and landmark along the iconic point-to-point layout.

“The first time you race a course it’s kind of nerve-racking,” Cragg admits. “But I’ve been able to come train on it and hopefully know the course well enough where I’ll be more worried about my competitors than the course itself. I feel like I know it really well.”

On recent weekends, she shared the roads with area running clubs and charity teams who were out doing their own recon work, exchanging high fives and fist bumps while feeding off the energy of a marathon-crazed community.

“The Boston Marathon is huge wherever you are in the United States,” Cragg says. “But in New England, it’s just a different feel. Months out people start getting excited for Boston. It is the race here.”

On Monday, Cragg will line up against a loaded elite field consisting of 12 women with personal bests faster than her own, including Marblehead, Mass., native Shalane Flanagan, who finished fourth and seventh at Boston the past two years, and Desiree Linden, Cragg’s college teammate who nearly pulled off the win on Boylston Street in 2011 and finished 10th here last year. Former champions Sharon Cherop and Caroline Kilel are also in the field, along with last year’s top returning finisher Buzunesh Deba of Ethiopia. It’s the type of place-over-pace situation Cragg relishes being in as an aggressive competitor who has a penchant for being at her best in championship-style races.

“If I can be there at the end I think it’s anyone’s race, but I definitely wouldn’t discount myself in that situation,” Cragg says. “I would absolutely just go for it.”

PHOTOS: 2015 Boston Marathon Press Conferences

The post Amy Cragg Hoping For A Memorable Boston Debut appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/boston-marathon/amy-cragg-hoping-for-a-smooth-landing-in-boston_126605/feed 0
Healthy But ‘Underprepared,’ Ritzenhein Ready to Race Boston http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/boston-marathon/healthy-but-underprepared-ritzenhein-ready-to-race-boston_126595 http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/boston-marathon/healthy-but-underprepared-ritzenhein-ready-to-race-boston_126595#comments Fri, 17 Apr 2015 18:36:40 +0000 http://running.competitor.com/?p=126595

Dathan Ritzenhein fields questions at a press conference for the 2015 Boston Marathon. He's the third fastest marathoner in American history, but he's running Boston for the first time. Photo: Brian Metzler

The Michigan native wants to do well in Boston, but more importantly, he wants to stay healthy.

The post Healthy But ‘Underprepared,’ Ritzenhein Ready to Race Boston appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

Dathan Ritzenhein fields questions at a press conference for the 2015 Boston Marathon. He's the third fastest marathoner in American history, but he's running Boston for the first time. Photo: Brian Metzler

Make no doubt about it, Dathan Ritzenhein wants to make the U.S. Olympic team for the fourth time.

And that’s one of the reasons he’s looking at his first Boston Marathon on Monday as a stepping stone of sorts. With a variety of past injuries behind him and a new training base in his old West Michigan stomping grounds, Ritzenhein, 32, has a renewed energy but a conservative optimism about running his first marathon in 18 months.

Although he’s plenty fit—a third-place finish at the U.S. Cross Country Championships in Boulder on Feb. 7 and a 1:02:07 sixth-place showing at the NYC Half Marathon on March 15 are proof—he arrived in Boston a bit unprepared by design.

With the intent of staying healthy so he can train well for the 2016 U.S. Olympic Trials Marathon next February, he says he didn’t max out his mileage as he’s done in previous buildups—plus he ran fewer hard sessions and didn’t make a trip to a high-altitude training ground like Flagstaff, Ariz., Boulder, Colo., or Park City, Utah.

“For me right now, this has been a step back in the right direction,” he says. “I’m not sure what to expect on race day, but I know going in that I made it to the starting line healthy and every time that’s happened it’s been a success in itself, and I’ve put myself in position to do well.”

RELATED: Competitor’s Boston Marathon Coverage

That’s not to say he doesn’t plan on being competitive. For the moment, Ritz is just excited to be healthy and able to race. While he’s experienced amazing success in his career—ranging from an American record in the 5,000 (12:56.27), a bronze medal at the 2009 World Half Marathon Championships (in a 1:00:00 PR) and a ninth-place 2:07:47 PR effort at the 2012 Chicago Marathon—he’s also been bitten by the injury bug more times than he cares to remember.

Ritznehein’s last marathon was a solid, fifth-place 2:09:45 showing at Chicago in 2013. He had hoped to race in Boston last year, but a sports hernia forced him to withdraw six weeks before the race.

The third-fastest marathoner in U.S. history behind Ryan Hall (2:04:58, Boston, 2011; 2:06:17, London, 2008) and Khalid Khannouchi (2:05:38, London, 2002), Ritzenehein is the 12th-fastest runner entered in Monday’s elite field, which also includes former world-record holder Patrick Makau of Kenya (2:03:38) and defending champion Meb Keflezighi of the U.S. (2:08:37).

“I do feel like I have something yet to prove in the marathon, but at the same time, for me, being back healthy, is a big stepping stone and I have to think about 2016 as well,” he said. “I’ll have to be a little more patient than I’ve been in a lot of other marathons. My goal here is to finish hard, finish strong. Where that leaves me—winning it, on the podium, top 5 or whatever—if I finish this strong and I come out of this well, I can keep moving forward and that’s the most important thing.”

Getting a good race under his belt in Boston will set him up for his next block of training as he starts to prepare for the Olympic Trials Marathon in Los Angeles. He earned Olympic berths in the 10,000-meter run in 2004 and 2012, but had his best Olympics in 2008 when he placed ninth in the marathon (2:11:59) in Beijing. Only a few American distance runners have made four Olympic teams, so he knows earning a trip to the Rio Olympics would be very special.

VIDEO: Pre-Race Interview With Meb Keflezighi

Ritzenhein says he has been energized training back in his hometown of Rockford, Mich., where he and his wife, Kalin, were high school stars from 1998-2001 before heading to the University of Colorado. They moved back last June with their two young children in tow after several years in Portland, Ore., where Dathan trained under Alberto Salazar at the Nike campus.

Aside from being close to family in West Michigan, Ritzenhein has also been able to pick the brain of former high school teammate Jason Hartmann, who famously capped his career with back-to-back fourth-place finishes in Boston in 2012 and 2013. Hartmann isn’t running as much as he used to but he’s paced Ritz through some of his runs on a bike and joined him for his last 20-miler. He’s also connected with 1983 Boston Marathon champion Greg Meyer, who grew up and continues to live in nearby Grand Rapids.

“Sometimes you feel that weight on you a little bit when things are going bad, so being back in Michigan has been a big boost for me,” he says. “When things are hard, it always feels like you’re getting kicked to the ground and that can be a drag. So being back in a supportive environment with my family and friends in a community that really coalesces around me gives me a lot of energy and support.”

 RELATED: How to Watch the 2015 Boston Marathon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The post Healthy But ‘Underprepared,’ Ritzenhein Ready to Race Boston appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/boston-marathon/healthy-but-underprepared-ritzenhein-ready-to-race-boston_126595/feed 0
Photos: 2015 Boston Marathon Press Conferences http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/photos/photos-2015-boston-marathon-press-conferences_126582 http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/photos/photos-2015-boston-marathon-press-conferences_126582#comments Fri, 17 Apr 2015 18:09:35 +0000 http://running.competitor.com/?p=126582

The elite runners met the press three days before the Boston Marathon.

The post Photos: 2015 Boston Marathon Press Conferences appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

The elite runners met the media on Friday morning at the Fairmont Copley Plaza Hotel, and Competitor was there to document it all.

RELATED: Competitor’s 2015 Boston Marathon Coverage

Here are some of the sights, taken by Scott Draper:

The post Photos: 2015 Boston Marathon Press Conferences appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/photos/photos-2015-boston-marathon-press-conferences_126582/feed 0
Video: Pre-Race Interview with Meb http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/video/video-pre-race-interview-with-meb_126574 http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/video/video-pre-race-interview-with-meb_126574#comments Fri, 17 Apr 2015 17:10:55 +0000 http://running.competitor.com/?p=126574

We caught up with Meb Keflezighi at the Boston Marathon press conferences.

The post Video: Pre-Race Interview with Meb appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

Three more days to go until race day and we asked last year’s champ Meb Keflezighi his thoughts on running this year’s Boston Marathon, his strategy and looking ahead to the Olympic Marathon Trials in 2016.

RELATED: Competitor’s 2015 Boston Marathon Coverage

The post Video: Pre-Race Interview with Meb appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/video/video-pre-race-interview-with-meb_126574/feed 0
Photos: Desiree Linden’s Morning Run in Boston http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/photos/photos-desiree-lindens-morning-run-in-boston_126553 http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/photos/photos-desiree-lindens-morning-run-in-boston_126553#comments Fri, 17 Apr 2015 16:39:20 +0000 http://running.competitor.com/?p=126553

The American hopeful explores Boston three days before the marathon.

The post Photos: Desiree Linden’s Morning Run in Boston appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

Three days before the Boston Marathon, American contender Desiree Linden went on a morning run in Boston along the Charles River and invited Competitor to tag along. Here’s a look at her tour of Boston, in pictures. (All photos by Scott Draper)

RELATED: Desiree Linden Looking to Add to Her Boston Resume

The post Photos: Desiree Linden’s Morning Run in Boston appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/photos/photos-desiree-lindens-morning-run-in-boston_126553/feed 0
3 Pacing Strategies to PR Your Next Race http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/training/3-pacing-strategies-to-pr-your-next-race_126544 http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/training/3-pacing-strategies-to-pr-your-next-race_126544#comments Fri, 17 Apr 2015 05:59:39 +0000 http://running.competitor.com/?p=126544

Photo: Shutterstock.com

There are different ways to pace yourself—which one works best for you?

The post 3 Pacing Strategies to PR Your Next Race appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

Photo: Shutterstock.com


Running a personal best requires a combination of factors that all must come together on race day:

  • Fitness (the most important!)
  • Race execution
  • Outside issues like the course and weather
  • Some luck

Today we’re going to discuss how to pace your race. And if you’re like many runners, you may have struggled with how to execute a particular pacing strategy on race day.

I’ve heard from countless runners who experience struggles like:

“I can’t change paces at the end of a race and always get out-sprinted.”

“It’s hard for me to run negative splits, even if I wear a pace band.”

“How do you actually run at race pace during the race? I can’t get up to that speed when it’s time to race!”

Over the last five years, I’ve helped thousands of runners get faster and attain new PRs in distances from the mile to 100-mile ultras. And how you race is an overlooked element of running fast.

Whether you’re chasing a sub-3 hour marathon or just hoping to run your first 5K, knowing how to race is a valuable skill that can be applied to all of your future races.

Depending on the distance, there are three approaches that all work well to help you cross the finish line in a new personal best. Let’s go over each one, illustrating how to use each race strategy and more importantly, when it’s most appropriate.

The post 3 Pacing Strategies to PR Your Next Race appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2015/04/training/3-pacing-strategies-to-pr-your-next-race_126544/feed 0