Competitor.com http://running.competitor.com Your Online Source for Running Tue, 02 Sep 2014 23:58:22 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.5.2 Photos: Amazing Scenes From Chamonix http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/photos/photos-scenes-chamonix_112562 http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/photos/photos-scenes-chamonix_112562#comments Tue, 02 Sep 2014 23:58:22 +0000 Brian Metzler and Allison Pattillo http://running.competitor.com/?p=112562

Click through these photos to get a glimpse of the sights and scenes from last week in the trail running valhalla of Chamonix, France.

The post Photos: Amazing Scenes From Chamonix appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

This past week, more than 7,500 trail runners from 77 countries converged on Chamonix, France, for five races connected to the Ultra-Trail du Mont-Blanc. Included in that mix were more than 180 American runners—an all-time high for the event that has grown dramatically since its inception in 2003. Rory Bosio, a pediatric intensive care nurse from Truckee, Calif., was the women’s winner in the 104-mile UTMB, while Jason Schlarb from Boulder, Colo., was fourth in the men’s UTMB race. Click through these photos to get a glimpse of the sights and scenes from the week!

RELATED: Bosio Repeats As UTMB Champion

 

 

The post Photos: Amazing Scenes From Chamonix appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/photos/photos-scenes-chamonix_112562/feed 0
24 Must-Do September/October Races Across The U.S. http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/news/24-must-septemberoctober-race-across-u-s_112813 http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/news/24-must-septemberoctober-race-across-u-s_112813#comments Tue, 02 Sep 2014 23:37:51 +0000 Competitor.com http://running.competitor.com/?p=112813

Freedom's Run, Photo: Ron Agner and Tina Dawn Stratton

Drink wine, learn about Civil War history, get muddy or raise money for cancer research by running one of these fall races.

The post 24 Must-Do September/October Races Across The U.S. appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

Freedom's Run, Photo: Ron Agner and Tina Dawn Stratton

Drink wine, learn about Civil War history, get muddy or raise money for cancer research by running one of these fall races. 

MID-ATLANTIC

Annapolis Run for the Light House
Sept. 28; Annapolis, Md.
annapolisrunforthelighthouse.org 

This 13.1-miler aims to raise awareness for the hundreds of homeless people in and around the Annapolis area. Benefitting the Light House, a homeless shelter, all proceeds for the half marathon and the ensuing 5K fun run will go directly toward programs such as job counseling and life skills training. An added bonus: The scenic and flat course—taking you through Quiet Waters Park, overlooking the Chesapeake Bay— is as tranquil as they come.

 

Freedom’s Run
Oct. 4; Harpers Ferry, W.Va.
freedomsrun.org

Get a hearty dose of history by running this point-to-point marathon set in the shadows of the Blue Ridge Mountains near the confluence of the Potomac and the Shenandoah rivers. In 26.2 miles, you’ll run through four national parks, tracing a similar route taken by Confederate soldiers during the Civil War. Channel the spirit of those soldiers as you run along the flat C&O Canal and through rolling battlefields en route to freedom, er, the finish line. Rather run a shorter distance? Choose from a half marathon, 10K or 5K.

Halloween Hustle 5K
Oct. 24; Montgomery Village, Md.
eliteracemanagement.com/halloween-hustle-5k

Do the hustle! This 5K isn’t just any old fun run. Participants are encouraged to dress up in their Halloween finest for this out-and-back race. Aside from overall and age-group awards, there will be prizes for best adult, kids and group costumes. A 1K kids race, trick-or-treat activity and a bounce house makes this race a spook-tacular family affair.

The post 24 Must-Do September/October Races Across The U.S. appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/news/24-must-septemberoctober-race-across-u-s_112813/feed 0
A Runner’s Guide To Ice Baths http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/recovery/runners-guide-ice-baths_112350 http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/recovery/runners-guide-ice-baths_112350#comments Tue, 02 Sep 2014 22:21:35 +0000 Greg McMillan, M.S. http://running.competitor.com/?p=112350

Many runners praise how ice baths make their legs feel.

The usefulness of ice baths is debated, but there’s a compromise. Eggs are good for you. Eggs are bad eggs for you. Eggs are good for

The post A Runner’s Guide To Ice Baths appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

Many runners praise how ice baths make their legs feel.

The usefulness of ice baths is debated, but there’s a compromise.

Eggs are good for you. Eggs are bad eggs for you. Eggs are good for you. If you’re middle-aged like I am, you’re used to conflicting advice on everything from nutrition to stretching to training volume and intensity.

The same goes for ice baths. There are so many conflicting reports that it’s hard to know what to do. On the one hand, coaches and athletes have been using ice baths successfully for years. They find that ice bathing helps tired legs (and minds) feel better which means subsequent training sessions can be of a higher quality. Higher quality training (and the greater confidence that comes from it) typically leads to higher quality racing.

On the other hand, physiologists reveal that the inflammation from training (the feeling of slightly sore and “flat” legs) stimulates important fitness adaptations. If you shunt this inflammation with ice baths, you short circuit this important training process and may have less adaptation.

So, we’re stuck with the conundrum of wanting to feel better in training but also wanting the greatest adaptation from our hard work.

The best solution I’ve heard (and recommend to the athletes I coach) comes from U.S. 50K national champion and online running coach Emily Harrison. Harrison advises that runners periodize their ice bathing similar to how they structure their training. Here’s how:

“In order to get the most from the adaptation that comes from training stress, limit ice bathing in the initial part of your training plan. Use them only when the body gets really ‘beat up’ and your training quality is starting to suffer, not just after a hard workout but for several days in a row, ” Harrison says.

As your race approaches, however, you should use ice baths more often to freshen up your legs and add a little giddy-up to your stride.

According to Harrison, “As you get within a month of your goal race, you want to start feeling good in all your workouts. This builds confidence, and building confidence at this late stage in the training trumps any reduction in training adaptation, especially since you should have already built up your fitness in the preceding weeks.”

I really like this idea, as it seems to be the best of both worlds. Early in the training, you allow the legs to be a little sore and tired to create the maximal training adaptations. You only take an ice bath if your training quality suffers for several days in a row.

But, as your race nears, you care more about feeling good and having awesome workouts. In this peaking period, you take frequent ice baths (one after most all hard workouts) so your legs always feel fresh and your racing confidence grows.

That’s a win-win in my book and takes advantage of both sides of the ice bath debate.

Ice Bath How-Tos:

— Fill bathtub or large container with water so that your legs and hips will be submerged.

— Add enough ice to lower the temperature of the water to 55 to 60 degrees Fahrenheit

— Bathe for approximately 15 minutes

Wimpy Tip:

If you often bail on the ice bath before numbness sets in, try this trick: First, fill the tub with cold water. Next, instead of adding ice and letting the water get cold, get in and submerge yourself. Then, add the ice. This way, the water gradually gets cold, allowing us wimps to get the full benefit of the ice bath. Of course, since the water is gradually getting cold, you’ll need to stay in the bath a bit longer. Twenty to 25 minutes usually works.

Other Options:

If cold isn’t your thing, note that coaches and athletes also find success with warm water therapies like a hot tub or Epsom salt bath. U.S. cross-country champion Amy Van Alstine mentioned in a previous interview on Competitor.com that she prefers the Epsom bath and finds it works best for her. As with most things in running, you are an experiment of one so you may have to try a few things and see what works for you.

Power of the Mind:

Enhance the effects of ice bathing by adjusting your mindset. Research has shown that athletes who believe the ice baths will help them get a great benefit over those who are skeptical. So, if you don’t “believe” in ice baths, either don’t do them or if you do take the plunge, remember that you’ll get better results if you begin to convince yourself of their effectiveness.

****

About The Author:

Greg McMillan, M.S. provides training plans and online coaching for runners of all abilities through his website www.mcmillanrunning.com. Outside Magazine calls his McMillan Running Calculator the “Best Running Calculator” and his latest book, YOU (Only Faster), continues to receive rave reviews from runners and coaches.

The post A Runner’s Guide To Ice Baths appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/recovery/runners-guide-ice-baths_112350/feed 0
Ask Mario: How Much Should I Drink When It’s Hot Out? http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/training/ask-mario-much-drink-hot_112837 http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/training/ask-mario-much-drink-hot_112837#comments Tue, 02 Sep 2014 21:26:22 +0000 Mario Fraioli http://running.competitor.com/?p=112837

The importance of hydration is magnified in hot weather. Photo: shutterstock.com.

Q. Mario, After a relatively mild summer on the east coast, we’re experiencing a late heat wave with temperatures skyrocketing into

The post Ask Mario: How Much Should I Drink When It’s Hot Out? appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

The importance of hydration is magnified in hot weather. Photo: shutterstock.com.

Q.

Mario,

After a relatively mild summer on the east coast, we’re experiencing a late heat wave with temperatures skyrocketing into the 90s last week—not to mention the accompanying high humidity. I’m in the middle of marathon training so I’ve been running long (16-20 miles) every weekend. How should I adjust my hydration strategy in the hot weather? Should I drink more? Or more often? Any advice would be super helpful!

Thanks!

Amanda G.

A.

Amanda,

Having spent most of my life living (and running) in New England before moving to California a few years ago, I can commiserate with the recent late summer temperature surge and the problems it can create around marathon training. As if the weekend long runs weren’t grueling enough!

The important thing to keep in mind is that as runners, we come in different shapes and sizes, which means that we all sweat at different rates and that our individual hydration needs are going to vary as well.

The Mayo Clinic recommends adults consume between 2 and 3 liters, or 70 and 105 fluid ounces (this includes water and other liquids) per day in a temperate climate. Of course, individual adjustments need to be made for age, activity level, sweat rate and, in your particular case, warmer conditions. As a general rule, the bigger you are, the more sweat you’ll lose through activity and thus the more fluids you’ll need to replace.

When heat and humidity are high, dehydration is an obvious concern, as is hyponatremia, a dangerous condition in which sodium levels in the blood get too low. Throughout the year, but especially when it’s really warm out, it’s good practice to have a 20-25 ounce water bottle on you at all times throughout the day and to sip from it regularly. Aim to empty this bottle 3-5 times per day depending on your size and sweat rate. Be sure you’re taking in electrolytes (sports drinks, enhanced waters and electrolyte drink mixes are good sources) in addition to water in order to maintain proper fluid balance and muscle function in the body. While running on a hot day (70-plus degrees), carry fluids with you or run a route where there are plenty of drinking fountains (“bubblers” where I’m from).

Before you even fill up the bottles in your hydration belt for a run, however, make sure you’re hydrating well throughout the day, not just when you’re out running. In her book Sports Nutrition for Endurance Athletes, nutritionist Monique Ryan recommends drinking 16 ounces of fluid before bed the night before a race, long run or big workout. In the 2–3 hours before a long run or race, she suggests runners aim to consume 16–24 ounces of fluid in the form of water, sports drink, or juice. This will ensure that you’ve topped off your tank while giving your kidneys plenty of time to process fluids.

Ryan also advises that when running over 90 minutes, whether in training or during a race, runners should start drinking early and consume 4–8 ounces of fluid every 15–20 minutes in an effort to stay on top of hydration levels. For some, this may be a bit much and cause feelings of fullness late in a race or long run, so use your long training runs as an experiment to find out what works for you.

So now that you know when to drink, the question becomes, what should you drink? Again, the answer depends on the runner and his or her individual needs. Over the course of a half marathon, marathon or a really long training run, you’ll lose not only water, but also important electrolytes such as sodium and potassium that are necessary to maintain muscle function. The easiest way to replace those electrolytes lost through sweat is by taking some form of sports drink, which will contain a mix of electrolytes in the form of sodium chloride and potassium, as well as simple sugars that will help keep the muscles fueled and functioning properly.

If the sugary stuff doesn’t sit well in your stomach, however, there are plenty of other excellent options, including sugar-free, low-calorie electrolyte drink mixes, as well as electrolyte pills and salt tablets that, when combined with regular water intake, will keep your electrolyte levels up. If you don’t like the idea of straying too far from water or popping pills into your mouth, basic foods such as pretzels and bananas are chock-full of everything you need to accomplish the same goal.

Staying on top of your hydration in the heat and humidity can be tricky, but keeping these key points in mind will allow you to get the most out of your remaining long runs and set you up to hit your goal on race day.

Hang in there. Cooler fall temps are (hopefully) around the corner!

Mario

Ask Mario appears monthly in Competitor magazine and weekly on Competitor.com. Have a question for Mario? Submit it here.

The post Ask Mario: How Much Should I Drink When It’s Hot Out? appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/training/ask-mario-much-drink-hot_112837/feed 0
Shoe Of The Week: Special Edition Saucony Kona Kinvara 5 http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/news/shoe-week-special-edition-saucony-kona-kinvara-5_112771 http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/news/shoe-week-special-edition-saucony-kona-kinvara-5_112771#comments Tue, 02 Sep 2014 19:00:38 +0000 Brian Metzler http://running.competitor.com/?p=112771

Saucony released a limited-edition version of the Kinvara 5 in celebration of the 2014 Ironman World Championship on Oct. 11 in Hawaii.

Saucony has continued to revise the popular Kinvara lightweight trainer without messing with any of its best features.

The post Shoe Of The Week: Special Edition Saucony Kona Kinvara 5 appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

Saucony released a limited-edition version of the Kinvara 5 in celebration of the 2014 Ironman World Championship on Oct. 11 in Hawaii.

Saucony has continued to revise the popular Kinvara lightweight trainer without messing with any of its best features. The new Kinvara 5 has been revamped with a new mesh upper that offers a more snug, athletic fit while also serving up greater flexibility and durability than previous editions. It also utilizes a similar but slightly updated outsole and midsole package as in previous versions—made with a more abrasion-resistant enhanced EVA material and has a few more small sections of durable rubber on the outsole. Also, a new plushly lined collar helps keep the heel in place with comfort. It has the same lightweight, low-to-the-ground feel with plenty of soft cushioning and a low heel-toe offset.

For the second year in a row, Saucony is making a special version of the Kinvara for its pro athletes and age-group competitors in the 2014 Ironman World Championship on Oct. 11 in Kailua-Kona, Hawaii. By reserving a pair in an advanced online sale through Kona Beach & Sports beginning Sept. 3, age-group qualifiers will be invited to an exclusive Luau Launch Party on Oct. 8 in Kona, where they will pick up their shoes and be able to share the evening with Saucony’s elite athletes. A limited amount of the Kona Kinvara 5 will also be available at Saucony.com beginning Oct. 8.

Price: $110
Weights: 7.7 oz. (men’s), 6.7 oz. (women’s)
Heel-Toe Offset: 22mm (heel), 18mm (forefoot)
Info: saucony.com

RELATED: Shoe Of The Week—Hoka One One Clifton

The post Shoe Of The Week: Special Edition Saucony Kona Kinvara 5 appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/news/shoe-week-special-edition-saucony-kona-kinvara-5_112771/feed 0
Eat Your Potatoes: Nature Doesn’t Make Junk Food http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/nutrition/eat-your-potatoes-nature-doesnt-make-junk-food_37502 http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/nutrition/eat-your-potatoes-nature-doesnt-make-junk-food_37502#comments Tue, 02 Sep 2014 16:50:09 +0000 Matt Fitzgerald http://running.competitor.com/?p=37502

Potatoes contain a wealth of nutritional benefits. Photo: www.shutterstock.com

Research helps rehabilitate the potato.

The post Eat Your Potatoes: Nature Doesn’t Make Junk Food appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

Potatoes contain a wealth of nutritional benefits. Photo: www.shutterstock.com

Research helps rehabilitate the potato.

The potato may be the Kim Kardashian of the food world: much more popular than respected. The potato is the most heavily consumed vegetable in the American diet, with the average American eating 126 pounds of potatoes a year. Yet ever since the advent of the low-carb diet craze, the potato has been maligned as a nutrient-poor, fattening and natural junk food. The godfather of that craze, Robert Atkins, went so far as to classify the potato among his top-three “danger foods.”

Research from 2011 suggests that the potato never deserved such ignominy. The latest advance in the scientific rehabilitation of the potato comes out of the University in Scranton in Pennsylvania. A team of researchers led by Joe Vinson studied the effects of adding two purple potatoes a day to the diets of 18 overweight, hypertensive subjects for a period of one month. Although the majority of these subjects took antihypertensive medication, their blood pressure dropped by another 4 percent on average during their month of potato eating. In addition, they gained no weight.

Other studies have found that nutrients contained in potatoes have antioxidant and anti-tumor effects in the human body. The source of all of these healthful properties of the potato appears to be polyphenols, which all varieties of potatoes contain in abundance. Polyphenols are a class of antioxidants also found in wine and tea.

While no one would recommend living on potatoes alone (although it has been done in some places during periods of war and economic depression), the overall nutrition profile of the potato is very good. Obviously, the nutrient that the potato contains in greatest abundance is carbohydrate. Since the potato delivers its carbohydrate without any fat or anything artificial, it’s a very good source of the energy athletes need to maintain high training workloads. Potatoes are also rich in vitamin C, B vitamins and potassium, while the skins contain large amounts of fiber. There is not a lot of protein in potatoes, but that protein is very high quality, with a biological value above 90.

RELATED: 10 Reasons To Eat Potatoes

Now, it’s important to note that the potatoes consumed in the University of Scranton study were not fried or smothered in butter and sour cream but microwaved and eaten plain. While the potato itself is not unhealthy, the way most of us eat most of our potatoes—namely, as french fries and potato chips—most certainly is. Consider this: a plain baked potato delivers a modest 26 calories per ounce, whereas french fries pack more than 92 calories per ounce.

I, for one, am not surprised to see the potato redeemed by contemporary nutrition research. I never bought into the anti-carb slander of the potato, and not only because I have Irish ancestry and love potatoes in all forms of preparation. No, the real reason I never stopped believing in the potato is that I believe in the principle that nature does not create junk food. All foods are healthful in their natural forms. It’s what we do to natural foods—and not just potatoes—that makes them “danger foods.”

The potato is hardly the only food that has been attacked from the perspective of a blinkered nutritional philosophy that blinds adherents to the principle that nature does not create junk food. Nuts have long been avoided by low-fat diet adherents because of their high fat content, despite evidence that regular nut eaters tend to be slimmer than nut avoiders. Eggs were defamed because of their cholesterol content but have lately made a comeback in reputation based on evidence that eating eggs actually lowers cholesterol in the body. Wheat is taking a beating today, from gluten hysterics on one flank and from the Neanderthal diet cult on another, but mark my words: wheat will live to see its name cleared too.

RELATED: Purple Potatoes Linked To Lower Blood Pressure, No Weight Gain

Our modern diet culture is an environment of fads, trends, mixed messages and too much information. If you pay close attention to it, you’re likely to be talked into doing silly things such as avoiding fruit because of its high sugar content. You’re better off taking a step back from the marketplace of ever-changing nutrition information and staying focused on a few core principles of healthy eating that never change. Like this one: Nature doesn’t create junk food.

****

About The Author:

Matt Fitzgerald is the author of numerous books, including Racing Weight: How To Get Lean For Peak Performance (VeloPress, 2012). He is also a Training Intelligence Specialist for PEAR Sports. To learn more about Matt visit www.mattfitzgerald.org.

The post Eat Your Potatoes: Nature Doesn’t Make Junk Food appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/nutrition/eat-your-potatoes-nature-doesnt-make-junk-food_37502/feed 1
Amanda Brooks: Lessons In Injury Prevention http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/saucony-26-strong/amanda-brooks-lessons-injury-prevention_112774 http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/saucony-26-strong/amanda-brooks-lessons-injury-prevention_112774#comments Tue, 02 Sep 2014 16:28:39 +0000 Amanda Brooks http://running.competitor.com/?p=112774

Amanda Brooks discovered years ago that she needs to listen to her body. Photo: Amanda Brooks

Amanda Brooks learned the painful way that listening to your body as an athlete is crucial.

The post Amanda Brooks: Lessons In Injury Prevention appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

Amanda Brooks discovered years ago that she needs to listen to her body. Photo: Amanda Brooks

As with most lessons that are learned the hard way, this one stung and completely changed my approach to running.

A few years after completing my first marathon, I started to notice a wave of friends focusing on this new goal: Boston Qualifying. While speed had never been a particular goal of mine, I was simply focused on running longer and enjoying it more, suddenly I thought it sounded like a good goal.

I dove headfirst into speed workouts and focused on a time goal that was probably outside of my reach. But hey “dream big,” right? After a few months of these workouts, I developed IT Band Syndrome.

My first injury after four years of running was literally a textbook case:

— Too much
— Too soon
— Not enough cross-training

Unfortunately, I did what many runners do with an injury. I continued to run, right up until I couldn’t even walk, which lead to a three-week hiatus from running in the month prior to my marathon.

As the weeks passed, I returned to running easy and lined up at the 2007 Rock ’n’ Roll San Diego Marathon ready to run against all the words of caution I’d received from experienced runners and my own better judgment.

Miles 1-12 flew by then we hit the graded incline to mile 13 and my IT Band began to scream. It wasn’t whispering slow down, it was screaming, “if you don’t quit this very instant I’ll make you pay.”

But I’d trained for months, I couldn’t possibly quit. So I began to walk. At first I was maintaining a 15-minute mile, but the pain continued to creep up and eventually I was limping along in an awkward half stride, half leg pull motion at a 22-minute mile.

I finished.

In the moment, I felt victorious. I’d pushed through and persevered. Isn’t that what good runners do?

Turns out the answer is no, they do not.

They listen to the signals that their body is sending because it’s never about just one race, it’s about a lifetime of running. And as I learned that day, pushing too far doesn’t just mean one poor finish. It means three months of no running and lots of physical therapy.

The greatest thing about this injury was what I learned in those three months:

— 5 minutes daily of quick exercises can prevent injuries
Dynamic warm-ups are worth the time
— I love running for the pure sake of running
Audiobooks and podcasts are amazing ways to pass the time

These lessons have served me well over the last seven years and minus a few aches here and there, I haven’t been sidelined for more than a few days at a time!

For more on the Saucony 26 Strong program, which pairs up 13 coaches with 13 marathon rookies, visit 26Strong.com.

The post Amanda Brooks: Lessons In Injury Prevention appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/saucony-26-strong/amanda-brooks-lessons-injury-prevention_112774/feed 0
3 Ways to Increase Running Cadence for Speed http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/training/3-ways-to-increase-running-cadence-for-speed_112765 http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/training/3-ways-to-increase-running-cadence-for-speed_112765#comments Tue, 02 Sep 2014 16:00:42 +0000 Lisa Hamilton http://running.competitor.com/?p=112765

Cadence can vary from runner to runner depending on stride length, height and other factors. Photo: www.shutterstock.com

Work on your leg turnover by following a few simple steps.

The post 3 Ways to Increase Running Cadence for Speed appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

Cadence can vary from runner to runner depending on stride length, height and other factors. Photo: www.shutterstock.com

Work on your leg turnover by following a few simple steps.

Hit a plateau in your running?

Feel like you’re slogging along while others float by?

Want a quick, easy way to get faster?

Increasing your cadence may be just what you need.

Cadence is the number of times your foot strikes the ground in a given time period, usually measured per minute. Because forward movement only happens when your feet strike the ground, it behooves you to get them off the ground as quickly as possible.

Your height, weight, leg and stride length and running ability will determine your optimal cadence. Everyday runners generally fall between 160-170 steps per minute, while elite runners strike the ground around 180 steps per minute or higher—with some getting above 200 at their fastest speeds.

Determine Your Cadence

On your next run, count the number of times each foot strikes the ground. To make it simpler, pick either your right or left foot, count the number of times it strikes the ground in a minute and multiply that by two. This is your training cadence.

There is a difference between a training cadence and a speed workout/racing cadence. Generally, your speed workout/racing cadence will be faster. Determine your cadence for both types of runs.

RELATED: 5 Exercises To Do Before Every Run

Improve Your Cadence

Improving cadence is not difficult, but it does take time. Give yourself six to eight weeks for your body to adapt to your new turnover. There are several ways to introduce a faster cadence into your runs. The top three are highlighted below.

1. Use a Metronome
A metronome is a device that produces a predetermined number, beats or clicks per minute that enable you to train by keeping a constant rhythm your body can recognize. Metronomes are great because you don’t have to count the number of steps you take per minute. Just set your desired number of beats per minute and run to the rhythm.

Other options besides beats and clicks include music set to a specified number of beats per minute.

For example, JogTunes has a number of songs that beat at a variety of cadences.

2. Visualize
Visualization, also called guided imagery, is the mental rehearsal of an activity. Athletes use visualization to mimic a desired outcome of a race or training session, or to simply relax. Through visualization, you train your mind and body to perform the skill you are imagining.

Studies with the bodies of athletes visualizing performances while hooked up to a monitor show that visualization mimics the stresses of an actual race. Their hearts beat faster, breaths quicken, awareness heightens and muscles tighten as though they were running a race.

Visualize yourself running with a faster cadence and notice how your body automatically adjusts to the rhythm in your mind.

RELATED: 3 Tips For Better Running Form

3. Run in Place
Stand in front of a mirror with your feet shoulder-width apart. Position your arms and hands as though you were running. Run in place as fast as you can, bringing your knees halfway up. Make sure your knees are pointing straight ahead and your heels are not touching the ground.

Run for 20 seconds, and then rest for one minute. Count the number of times your right foot strikes the ground. Repeat the drill two more times. Perform this drill a couple times per week. Note whether the number of times your right foot hits the ground increases. With this drill, you are teaching your feet to get off the ground as quickly as possible, which translates into a faster cadence.

Go Slowly

To avoid injury, increase your cadence by no more than two to five steps per minute. Don’t try to get your cadence up to 180 strikes per minute in one session. Increases in time and distance should also be gradual.

For example, begin by running one minute at a faster cadence, return to your original cadence for three to five minutes, and then run at the faster cadence again. Play with time to see what works for you.

RELATED: The 5 Most Common Running Form Mistakes

Another option would be to increase cadence by distance. For example, run every third mile at a higher cadence. The key is to continue to make the length of time/distance longer until your whole run is performed at a higher cadence.

Your body may need six to eight weeks to adapt to your higher cadence, but it will adapt and become part of muscle memory.

When you teach your body how to do something, such as ride a bike or run at a faster cadence, it creates a physiological road map you can draw on at any time. So the next time you line up for a race or a run, you won’t have to think about your legs turning over quickly; they already will.

****

About The Author:

 

Lisa Hamilton is a 1:16 half marathoner, 2:43 marathoner and the heart and soul behind the site The Conscious Runner. With a focus on conscious running, Lisa helps runners meet their goals and feel great while doing it.

The post 3 Ways to Increase Running Cadence for Speed appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/training/3-ways-to-increase-running-cadence-for-speed_112765/feed 0
Glossary For Going 100 Miles http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/news/glossary-for-going-100-miles_112759 http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/news/glossary-for-going-100-miles_112759#comments Tue, 02 Sep 2014 15:01:30 +0000 Allison Pattillo http://running.competitor.com/?p=112759

The Western States 100 Mile Endurance Run is one of the four races that make up the Grand Slam of Ultrarunning. Photo: Mario Fraioli | Competitor.com

Are you familiar with the ultrarunner's lingo?

The post Glossary For Going 100 Miles appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

The Western States 100 Mile Endurance Run is one of the four races that make up the Grand Slam of Ultrarunning. Photo: Mario Fraioli | Competitor.com

Are you familiar with the ultrarunner’s lingo?

Every sport has its own language. Believe it or not, there was once a time when you didn’t know a split from a fartlek or a tempo workout. Knowledge is power, and this is your chance to brush up on the words and phrases of long distance running so you aren’t lost or offended when your new ultrarunning friend asks you to be their mule.

Check points/aid stations
Specific points along the route where racers must check in with race organizers so they can keep track of everyone along the course. These points often offer food and hydration and a place to connect with crew or collect drop bags.

Crew
Not only is it a herculean effort to run an ultra, the logistics of food, gear and racer support are a science all their own. Even for racers who choose not to run with a pacer, they usually opt for a crew to provide nourishment, gear changes and encouragement along the way. Crews are generally limited to offering aid to their runners at specific points along the course.

Cutoff times
Much like in large road races, there are cutoff times along an ultra course. If you don’t make it to or out of an aid station by a certain time, you will not be allowed to finish the race.

Drop bags
Race organizers will transport racer bags to predetermined checkpoints along the course. Bags may contain whatever the racer thinks he will need, with some possibilities being warm layers, fresh clothes, headlamps for running in the dark, dry shoes and socks for after a water crossing and food.

RELATED: Ultrarunners Are A Quirky Bunch

Grand Slam of Ultrarunning
The Grand Slam consists of finishing the four oldest 100-mile races in the country, the Western States 100 Mile Endurance Run, the Vermont 100 Mile Endurance Run, the Leadville Trail 100 Mile Run and the Wasatch Front 100 Mile Endurance Run, in one season—which means, based upon race dates, from the end of June to the beginning of September.

Hypothermia
This is when body temperature drops dangerously low. Among other ways, it can result from prolonged exposure to cold temperatures, being wet and cold or being caught in bad weather without the proper gear (e.g. hunkering down to wait out a high elevation hail storm while wearing skimpy running clothes).

Muling
When a pacer carries food, water, gear or other supplies for their racer. The practice is not allowed in some races. In others, runners can ask their pacer to carry just about anything but them.

Outside aid
Support in the form of food, hydration or some other assistance that is offered at someplace other than an aid station or by your crew within a certain distance of an aid station. Some events do not allow outside aid.

Pacer
A pacer is someone who runs portions of an ultra with you. Rules vary from race to race as to whether or not pacers are allowed. Generally, they join about halfway through a race. Their job is to help keep their racer safe, provide encouragement and take blackmail pictures of racers when they throw up. Not all racers choose to run with a pacer.

RELATED: Trail Racing Vs. Road Racing

Service requirements
It is not uncommon for a volunteer component to be tied to a racer’s entry into an ultra. The requirements may include trail work, course marking or volunteering at another event.

Sleep monsters
As racers exert themselves for 20 hours, 30 hours and beyond, they reach new levels of all-encompassing exhaustion. A lack of sleep, taxed muscles and depleted energy stores can lead to on-the-go hallucinations, talking animals and walking trees and, well, the appearance of sleep monsters.

Total vert
This number that includes the combined amount of vertical climbing and descending in a race—a bigger number usually makes for better stories …

The post Glossary For Going 100 Miles appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/news/glossary-for-going-100-miles_112759/feed 0
Huddle, Mecheso Win U.S. 20K Titles In New Haven http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/news/huddle-mecheso-win-u-s-20k-titles-new-haven_112741 http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/news/huddle-mecheso-win-u-s-20k-titles-new-haven_112741#comments Mon, 01 Sep 2014 15:51:28 +0000 David Monti/Race Results Weekly http://running.competitor.com/?p=112741

Luke Puskedra, Girma Mecheso and Christo Landry fight for the win at the 37th annual Faxon Law New Haven Road Race on Monday in New Haven, Conn. Photo: Jane Monti/RRW

Molly Huddle continues her amazing year of running a day after turning 30.

The post Huddle, Mecheso Win U.S. 20K Titles In New Haven appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

Luke Puskedra, Girma Mecheso and Christo Landry fight for the win at the 37th annual Faxon Law New Haven Road Race on Monday in New Haven, Conn. Photo: Jane Monti/RRW

Luke Puskedra, Girma Mecheso and Christo Landry fight for the win at the 37th annual Faxon Law New Haven Road Race on Monday in New Haven, Conn. Photo: Jane Monti/RRW

Luke Puskedra, Girma Mecheso and Christo Landry fight for the win at the 37th annual Faxon Law New Haven Road Race on Monday in New Haven, Conn. Photo: Jane Monti/RRW

Molly Huddle continues her amazing year of running a day after turning 30.

(c) 2014 Race Results Weekly, all rights reserved. Used with permission.

Although the thunder storms that soaked this Connecticut city yesterday were gone, the air here was still thick with humidity, making fast running nearly impossible. To that end, Molly Huddle and Girma Mecheso forgot about time and simply ran for the win here on Monday at the 37th annual Faxon Law New Haven Road Race which served as the U.S. 20K championships.

For Huddle—who celebrated her 30th birthday yesterday—today’s race was more of a struggle than she anticipated.  After an opening mile of 5:15 where she was joined only by the mercurial Lindsay Scherf, Huddle began to feel the heat and humidity quickly.  She moderated her pace a little allowing her training partner Amy Hastings to come up on her shoulder by the 4-mile mark after Scherf had dropped back.  The two immediately felt a sense of comfort.

“I felt like we were doing a tempo run,” Huddle told Race Results Weekly.  Looking at Hastings she added,  ”At the time I thought I hadn’t done a tempo with you in a while since you started the marathon build-up.  So, I kind of smiled.”

The pair would run side by side through 10K (33:24) without a thought to the rest of the women’s field who were hundreds of meters back.  They tried to settle into a rhythm, but Huddle started to feel some cramping in her abdomen.

“It was nice, but it started to hurt,” lamented the sweat-soaked Huddle. Looking again at Hastings she said, “I was glad it was you and not someone else.”

In the eighth mile, Huddle put in a gentle surge and achieved a five-second gap on Hastings. On the quieter section of the course where a man had just pulled a wriggling fish from a small tributary, Huddle just tried to manage her discomfort and keep Hastings at a safe distance.

“I was, like, trying to surge and never sag,” Huddle said. “It was like back to New York (where she won the Oakley New York Mini 10-K in June) where I really fell off a lot.  But, I know that even though I’m going through rough patches, everyone is.  So, I just tried to put my head down, stick with Amy as long as possible and use the guys ahead of his.”

The gap between the two women closed slightly before the final long stretch to the finish on Whitney Avenue and then Temple Street, but Hastings eventually fell further back.  Huddle broke the tape in 1:08:34 in her debut at the distance, beating her training partner by a comfortable 20 seconds.  For Huddle, it was her third national title of the year (she also won at 5000m on the track and 7 miles on the road).

“I’m thrilled with the win,” Huddle said.  ”I was worried and turning around a lot. So, to come away with a win in an event that I’m not comfortable with, I’m really happy with.”

A resurgent Blake Russell, 39, took third place in 1:10:38, followed by Brianne Nelson (1:10:54) and Kelly Johnson (1:11:46).

For Mecheso, the former Oklahoma State star, the finish was much more thrilling. After a long, slow grind with key rivals Christo Landry, Luke Puskedra, Diego Estrada and Scott Bauhs, Mecheso put in a surge in the final mile which left Estrada and Bauhs off the back.

“At the end, with one mile to go, it was feeling so hard,” Mecheso told Race Results Weekly. “But, I was just hoping to cross the line, as you know winning is just a great day for me because it’s what we train for every day.”

The race came down to a three-way battle between Mecheso, Luke Puskedra, and Christo Landry, who had already won three U.S. road racing titles this year.  Landry, who had been fighting off a cramp on his right side, was trying to conserve himself for the final sprint, watching Mecheso and Puskedra slightly ahead of him.”

“I’m out in Seattle now, where it’s nice and clear,” Landry said. “They think 80 (degrees) is hot out there. I come here and it’s 80 during race time, and it was very, very humid. I just tried to take it easy as long as possible, hanging out at the back of the group, not looking to push the pace at all.” He continued: “I just tried to hang on to him…so I went for it.”

Landry was able to get past Puskedra, but fell a second short on catching Mecheso who won in 1:01:26, the slowest winning time here in 34 years. Landry got second (1:01:27) and Puskedra third (1:01:32).

“I’m so happy to win this race,” said Mecheso, who had just won his first U.S. title. “It was a great day for me.”

The post Huddle, Mecheso Win U.S. 20K Titles In New Haven appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/news/huddle-mecheso-win-u-s-20k-titles-new-haven_112741/feed 0
New Runner: Everything You Need To Know To Get Started http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/training/new-runner-everything-need-know-get-started_112670 http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/training/new-runner-everything-need-know-get-started_112670#comments Mon, 01 Sep 2014 14:36:58 +0000 Competitor.com http://running.competitor.com/?p=112670

Read and share these great stories full of tips for new runners. Photo: www.shutterstock.com

Check out our series of articles geared toward new and novice runners and share them with friends!

The post New Runner: Everything You Need To Know To Get Started appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

Read and share these great stories full of tips for new runners. Photo: www.shutterstock.com

Check out our series of articles geared toward new and novice runners and share them with friends!

Are you a new runner? Do you know someone who is just getting started or wants to get started? Check out our series of articles geared toward new and novice runners and share them with friends!

Be sure to check out our training resources, which include training plans, links to more stories, a pace calculator, a route finder and other helpful information.

New Runner: A Beginner’s Guide To Running
Start from scratch and build fitness slowly and safely over the course of two months.

New Runner: 5 Common Mistakes Newbies Make
Here are a few mistakes that running coaches see over and over again, plus how to easily fix them.

New Runner: Buying Your First Pair Of Shoes
Everything you need to know about buying your first pair of running shoes.

New Runner: 7 Fueling Facts
Learning the right way to fuel will lead to big running gains.

New Runner: Dynamic Stretching vs. Static Stretching
The combination of dynamic and static stretching—when used at the right time—can have a big impact on increasing flexibility and improving performance

New Runner: No Pain, No Gain?
Understanding the important differences between discomfort and pain.

New Runner: The Benefits of Running For Time
Here are four reasons why putting minutes before miles is a most excellent way to get started as a runner.

New Runner: How To Choose A Running Coach
A good coach will not only set you up with a training program, but they’ll keep you motivated and accountable, challenge you with a variety of workouts and help prepare you for the long run—no pun intended.

New Runner: Why You Should Keep A Running Log
For someone brand new to the sport, it is recommended to invest in (or make) your own running log.

New Runner: Buying Running Apparel & Accessories
Function and comfort should be at the top of your list; once preferences are narrowed down, you can have fun with fashion, flair and color.

New Runner: Signing Up For A Race
Start with the basics: have a goal, and a perfect beginner goal is a 5K race. But not just any race—one that fits perfectly in your calendar, has just the right amount of pizzaz and checks all the necessary boxes to make for a near-perfect race-day experience.

New Runner: 5K Training Tips For Newbies
Follow these guidelines and enjoy your path to the finish line!

New Runner: The Beginner’s Guide To The Half Marathon
Here’s a foolproof approach for completing 13.1 miles, plus a free training plan.

New Runner: 12 Exercises To Build Your Running Body
You can’t just run if you want to be a runner. These 12 exercises target every muscle that runners need for strength and balance.

New Runner: The 5 Most Troublesome Running Injuries (And How To Get Past Them!)
A quick look at the five most common running injuries, how they manifest themselves and the best ways to treat them.

SUBSCRIBE: Get A FREE Subscription To Competitor’s Digital Magazine!

The post New Runner: Everything You Need To Know To Get Started appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/training/new-runner-everything-need-know-get-started_112670/feed 0
Video: 26 Strong Competitor Cover Shoot http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/news/ready-26-strong-video-post_111329 http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/news/ready-26-strong-video-post_111329#comments Mon, 01 Sep 2014 10:12:47 +0000 Competitor.com http://running.competitor.com/?p=111329

Check out this behind-the-scenes video from a fun few days in Los Angeles!

The post Video: 26 Strong Competitor Cover Shoot appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

Check out this behind-the-scenes video from a fun few days in Los Angeles!

For the cover of the September issue of Competitor, we invited six runners from the 26 Strong training program to Hollywood for a photo shoot, some trail running and a couple of evenings hanging out on Sunset Boulevard. What is 26 Strong? It’s a marathon training program sponsored by Saucony and Competitor, in which 13 experienced runners serve as mentor coaches for 13 novices in search of their first marathon finish. The 13 runners have all made progress toward their fall marathon and several will conclude the program with their coach at the Honolulu Marathon in early December. Check out the video to see Lora Vaccaro (coach), Bridget Nixdorf (cadet), Jenny Poore (coach), Brittany Poore (cadet), Dorothy Beal (coach) and Danielle Shaffo (cadet) in action in some of the outtakes from the cover shoot and the highlights of early morning trail runs adjacent to the famous Hollywood sign in Bronson Canyon-Griffith Park and overlooking the Los Angeles metro area at Runyon Canyon Park.

PHOTOS: 26 Strong Competitor Cover Shoot

SUBSCRIBE: Get A FREE Subscription To Competitor’s Digital Magazine!

The post Video: 26 Strong Competitor Cover Shoot appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2014/09/news/ready-26-strong-video-post_111329/feed 0
Monday Minute: Supine Bridge http://running.competitor.com/2014/08/video/monday-minute-supine-bridge_6373 http://running.competitor.com/2014/08/video/monday-minute-supine-bridge_6373#comments Mon, 01 Sep 2014 03:38:04 +0000 Eric Cressey, MA, CSCS http://running.competitor.com/?p=6373

This exercise helps increase lower-leg power while reducing instances of knee and lower back injuries.

The post Monday Minute: Supine Bridge appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

This week we demonstrate the supine bridge, an exercise aimed at strengthening the glutes. Performing this exercise regularly will help to increase your power output while reducing instances of knee and lower back injuries.

RELATED: More 60-second strength training and injury prevention exercises on Competitor.com

The post Monday Minute: Supine Bridge appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2014/08/video/monday-minute-supine-bridge_6373/feed 1
Photos from Rock ‘n’ Roll Virginia Beach http://running.competitor.com/2014/08/photos/photos-rock-n-roll-virginia-beach_112597 http://running.competitor.com/2014/08/photos/photos-rock-n-roll-virginia-beach_112597#comments Sun, 31 Aug 2014 23:30:51 +0000 Competitor.com http://running.competitor.com/?p=112597

This Labor Day weekend race is a chart-topper. Over the past 14 years the Rock ’n’ Roll Running Festival Virginia Beach has stamped

The post Photos from Rock ‘n’ Roll Virginia Beach appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

This Labor Day weekend race is a chart-topper. Over the past 14 years the Rock ’n’ Roll Running Festival Virginia Beach has stamped itself as the end of summer’s 13.1-mile block party. Featuring  a fast, flat course that finishes on the oceanfront the event has become one of the premiere road races on the east coast. (Photos: PhotoRun.net)

SUBSCRIBE: Get A FREE Subscription To Competitor’s Digital Magazine!

 

The post Photos from Rock ‘n’ Roll Virginia Beach appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2014/08/photos/photos-rock-n-roll-virginia-beach_112597/feed 0
Eggleston Wins Rock ‘n’ Roll Virginia Beach http://running.competitor.com/2014/08/news/eggleston-wins-rock-n-roll-virginia-beach_112587 http://running.competitor.com/2014/08/news/eggleston-wins-rock-n-roll-virginia-beach_112587#comments Sun, 31 Aug 2014 22:31:09 +0000 Competitor.com http://running.competitor.com/?p=112587

Jeffrey Eggleston, right, made his decisive move midway through the race. Photo: PhotoRun.net

Lilian Marita of Kenya captures women's title.

The post Eggleston Wins Rock ‘n’ Roll Virginia Beach appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

Jeffrey Eggleston, right, made his decisive move midway through the race. Photo: PhotoRun.net

Lilian Marita of Kenya captures women’s title.

Saturday’s cool ocean breezes gave way to a steamy Sunday morning in Virginia Beach at the 14th Rock ‘n’ Roll Running Festival on Labor Day weekend. While American Jeffrey Eggleston outlasted his competition, he couldn’t outlast the conditions, narrowly missing his sub-65 minute goal to break the tape with a time of 1 hour, 5 minutes and 27 seconds.

PHOTOS: Rock ‘n’ Roll Virginia Beach Half Marathon

“It went pretty well, I’m happy to get the win,” said Eggleston. “I’ve been trying to build on my success going back to Boston finishing 8th and then running 2:10 in July, I focused my training and regrouped as I build up for the fall. Today was a really good step forward. I wanted to go out and win, and look forward to running faster.”

RELATED: For Eggleston, 2:10 Part Of The Progression

Eggleston, who recently ran a marathon personal best of 2:10:52 at the Gold Coast Marathon, tucked in with a lead pack of four athletes running an opening mile of 4:49. The threesome of North Carolina-based Kenyans Simion Chirchir, Betram Keter and Abraham Chelanga; pushed the sub-5 minute pace through five miles with a split of 24:45, when Eggleston began contemplating what would be a decisive move at a water station near mile six.

“The conditions were difficult out there and I had to strategize about when to make a move,” said Eggleston, who will race the Rock ‘n’ Roll Philadelphia Half Marathon on September 21. “I wanted to test the legs of the other athletes, they were going for water and weren’t really paying attention, I wanted to wake them up and see if anyone would respond. It was kind of funny because I really caught them off guard.”

The move, combined with the warm conditions, proved to be enough as Eggleston clicked five minute mile after five minute mile to open a sizeable gap. American Tyler Pennel, out of contention for most of the race, finished second overall with a time of 1:06:08. Pennel, who finished 4th at the U.S. Half Marathon Championships this year with a time of 1:01:45, used the Virginia Beach event as a tune-up race for the Metronic Twin Cities Marathon in Minneapolis in October.

“I went out there to do a marathon simulation type of race, start out at marathon pace and then pick it up the last couple miles. I really couldn’t pick it up that much as the humidity caught up with me, but it was still a good run,” said Pennel, who trains with the Zapp Fitness Group in Blowing Rock, NC. “It was a fun event, with the music and it was really cool how the course comes back on itself and the runners going the other way were cheering for the elites. Overall, I liked the course.”

SUBSCRIBE: Get A FREE Subscription To Competitor’s Digital Magazine!

Kenyan women swept the top-three spots in the women’s race with 26-year-old Lilian Marita crossing the finish line with a time of 1:15:29. Caroline Kiptoo finished second in 1:16:19, followed by Joyce Kandie in third with a time of 1:16:38.

Capping an annual Labor Day Weekend tradition, Grammy Award winning rock band Train served as the headliner for Sunday’s post-race concert on the beach.

The post Eggleston Wins Rock ‘n’ Roll Virginia Beach appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2014/08/news/eggleston-wins-rock-n-roll-virginia-beach_112587/feed 0
Runners Rock out Labor Day weekend http://running.competitor.com/2014/08/photos/runners-rock-labor-day-weekend_112498 http://running.competitor.com/2014/08/photos/runners-rock-labor-day-weekend_112498#comments Sun, 31 Aug 2014 19:44:46 +0000 Competitor.com http://running.competitor.com/?p=112498

Runners of all ages took over the Virginia Beach oceanfront for the Rock ‘n’ Roll Half Marathon

The post Runners Rock out Labor Day weekend appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

Thousands of runners took over the shores of Virginia Beach Labor Day weekend to participate in 14th Annual Rock ‘n’ Roll Virginia Beach ½ Marathon. Participants from all over turned out to compete in the half-marathon, 5k and relay race. Jeff Eggleston, a professional marathoner from Boulder, Colorado finished first in the half marathon. Runners can take advantage of signing up for the 15th Annual event in 2015 with a special $45 registration offer through Friday, September 5.

 

The post Runners Rock out Labor Day weekend appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2014/08/photos/runners-rock-labor-day-weekend_112498/feed 0
Rory Bosio Repeats As UTMB Champion http://running.competitor.com/2014/08/news/american-rory-bosio-repeats-utmb-champion_112392 http://running.competitor.com/2014/08/news/american-rory-bosio-repeats-utmb-champion_112392#comments Sat, 30 Aug 2014 22:00:00 +0000 Brian Metzler http://running.competitor.com/?p=112392

American Rory Bosio acknowledges the crowd after winning the 104-mile UTMB race for a second straight year. Photo: Brian Metzler

American wins prestigious UTMB race in France for the second straight year.

The post Rory Bosio Repeats As UTMB Champion appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

American Rory Bosio acknowledges the crowd after winning the 104-mile UTMB race for a second straight year. Photo: Brian Metzler

American Rory Bosio acknowledges the crowd after winning the 104-mile UTMB race for a second straight year. Photo: Brian Metzler

American Rory Bosio acknowledges the crowd after winning the 104-mile UTMB race for a second straight year. Photo: Brian Metzler

Bosio repeats as champion of the 104-mile Ultra-Trail du Mont-Blanc race that passes through France, Italy and Switzerland.

With a bloody knee and muddy legs, Rory Bosio crossed the finish line of the Ultra-Trail du Mont-Blanc late Saturday afternoon in Chamonix, France, to win the storied race for a second straight year.

After enduring a few rain showers, 13 mountain passes and 31,000 feet of climbing and descending over 104 miles in 23 hours, 20 minutes and 20 seconds of running, the 30-year-old pediatric intensive care nurse from Truckee, Calif., was her typical smiling self and ready to go dancing.

“That’s the best way to get the lactic acid out of your legs,” Bosio said with a playful smile after finishing the race through the spectactor-lined streets of Chamonix. “I’ll definitely go dancing, but not until I get a shower and a nap.”

The Ultra-Trail du Mont-Blanc is considered the world’s most prestigious trail race. It starts on Friday night in Chamonix and sends runners on a 168K (104-mile) voyage through parts of Italy and Switzerland before finishing back in Chamonix on Saturday.

Bosio, who finished the race wearing a royal blue “Eat My Dust” running skirt from The North Face and a sleeveless pink T-shirt, didn’t take the lead until almost the halfway point. She trailed several women early on, but finally passed Spain’s Nuria Picas, last year’s runner-up to Bosio, at the trail camp known as Refuge Berton, roughly mile 51 of the course.

“I tried to keep up as much as I could early in the race, but I had to realize that I’m not very good on the flats,” Bosio said. “Then when we got to the first real big climb at Notre Dame de la Gorge [near mile 19], I didn’t feel great. It wasn’t until after we left Courmayeur [mile 48] that I started to climb well and feel really good.”

RELATED: Americans Are Contenders At The UTMB In Chamonix

From there, Bosio found her groove and kept adding to the lead. She said she was inspired watching the sun rise on the way up Grand Col Ferret, the 8,169-foot pass that leads runners from Italy to Switzerland and one of the steepest and largest vertical climbs on the course. She ran the final 40 miles of the course unchallenged and finished 13th overall.

Although she was off her record pace from a year ago (last year she won in 22 hours, 37 minutes), Bosio wound up winning by more than 90 minutes over Picas (24:54).

Bosio works as contract nurse roughly eight days a month at the UC-Davis Medical Center in Sacramento. She trains on the trails around Lake Tahoe and drives 90 minutes to Sacramento for her work days, which are often grouped in two- or three-day blocks. But she says she never runs in Sacramento.

“That’s just not my kind of running, it’s just too flat,” she says. “And it works out well that those are my rest days from running.”

Last year, Bosio became the third American woman to win the the UTMB, following in the footsteps of Krissy Moehl (2003, 2009) and Nikki Kimball (2007). This year she became the first woman to win the race on the full course in back to back years. (Lizzy Hawker of the UK won the UTMB three straight years from 2010-2012, but the race was shortened due to weather in 2010 and 2012.)

RELATED: Rory Bosio—My Favorite Things

Bosio said she had many moments of discomfort along the way and also struggled in the sloppy mud caused from heavy rains in Switzerland about 12 hours before UTMB runners passed through.

“It was pretty hard for me this year because it was so muddy,” said Bosio, who strategically organized her blocks of work to spend seven weeks training for the race in Chamonix. “I can already tell my legs are way more sore than they were last year. I always feel so tense when I am running in mud like that. Some of the downhills were super, super muddy and that just made it slower for me.”

RELATED: Trail Queen—5 Questions With Rory Bosio

In the men’s race, Francois D’Haene of France won for the second time and set a new course record of 20:11:44. The top American finisher was Jason Schlarb, who placed fourth in 21:40.

“It was more vertical up and down than any other run in my life,” Schlarb said. “Had I not been here for three months, there is no way I could have held on for the last half. You just can’t get this in North America.”

Many top American runners dropped out, including Hal Koerner, Mike Foote and Timothy Olson. Anton Krupicka struggled over the second half of the race for the second straight year, this time with stomach issues. But he took at three and a half hour nap at the second to last aid station, got up and continued back to Chamonix, where he placed 47th in 26:30. Michael Wardian also stuck it out, finishing just after midnight local time in 30:40 (123rd place overall).

The UTMB will continue until the 46-hour cutoff time on Sunday morning.

SUBSCRIBE: Get A FREE Subscription To Competitor’s Digital Magazine!

The post Rory Bosio Repeats As UTMB Champion appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2014/08/news/american-rory-bosio-repeats-utmb-champion_112392/feed 0
Day 2 Rock ‘n’ Roll Running Festival Virginia Beach http://running.competitor.com/2014/08/photos/day-2-rock-n-roll-running-festival-virginia-beach_112420 http://running.competitor.com/2014/08/photos/day-2-rock-n-roll-running-festival-virginia-beach_112420#comments Sat, 30 Aug 2014 21:38:17 +0000 Competitor.com http://running.competitor.com/?p=112420

Runners rocked the first ever 1-mile beach run on the sand. Credit Ollie Neglerio. In its 14th year as the running community’s signature

The post Day 2 Rock ‘n’ Roll Running Festival Virginia Beach appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

Runners rocked the first ever 1-mile beach run on the sand. Credit Ollie Neglerio.

In its 14th year as the running community’s signature Labor Day Weekend celebration, the Rock ‘n’ Roll Running Festival Virginia Beach featured a 1-mile beach run on the sand. Nearly two thousand runners descended on the oceanfront Saturday morning to complete the first half of the Remix Challenge. Participants who complete two days of running will earn the coveted Remix Challenge medal, which will be awarded at the finish line on Sunday.

The post Day 2 Rock ‘n’ Roll Running Festival Virginia Beach appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2014/08/photos/day-2-rock-n-roll-running-festival-virginia-beach_112420/feed 0
Friday Fail: Mo Farah’s Saliva Accidentally Hits Photographer In Record-Smashing Race http://running.competitor.com/2014/08/video/friday-fail-mo-farahs-saliva-accidentally-hits-photographer-race_112363 http://running.competitor.com/2014/08/video/friday-fail-mo-farahs-saliva-accidentally-hits-photographer-race_112363#comments Fri, 29 Aug 2014 18:14:49 +0000 Emily Polachek http://running.competitor.com/?p=112363

A photographer got more than he bargained for while trying to get a great Mo Farah shot.  Last Sunday’s Grand Prix meet in

The post Friday Fail: Mo Farah’s Saliva Accidentally Hits Photographer In Record-Smashing Race appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

A photographer got more than he bargained for while trying to get a great Mo Farah shot. 

Last Sunday’s Grand Prix meet in Birmingham, England witnessed middle-distance runner and Olympic champion Mo Farah breaking the British 2-mile record—a record that has stood for almost 36 years. Spectators also happened to catch on video Farah’s saliva land on a photographer lying in the infield of the track as Farah made his last turn en route to victory.

Farah obliterated the record, set by Steve Ovett in 1978, by six seconds with a final time of 8:07.85. A tremendous feat for Farah, adding to his collection of now eight national records and claiming the European record for the 2-mile event as well. In this case Farah and his spit are winning. However, not so much for the photographer who failed (and had no idea) to choose a location outside of Farah’s unpredictable spitting range. Hopefully he still managed to get a great shot (not covered in spit).

SUBSCRIBE: Get A FREE Subscription To Competitor’s Digital Magazine!

The post Friday Fail: Mo Farah’s Saliva Accidentally Hits Photographer In Record-Smashing Race appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2014/08/video/friday-fail-mo-farahs-saliva-accidentally-hits-photographer-race_112363/feed 0
Coach’s Corner: Troubleshooting The Deadlift http://running.competitor.com/2014/08/training/coachs-corner-troubleshooting-deadlift_112262 http://running.competitor.com/2014/08/training/coachs-corner-troubleshooting-deadlift_112262#comments Fri, 29 Aug 2014 16:29:12 +0000 Jon-Erik Kawamoto, CSCS, CEP http://running.competitor.com/?p=112262

The deadlift is one of the most impactful exercises a runner can add to his or her weight training routine.

The post Coach’s Corner: Troubleshooting The Deadlift appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>

The deadlift is one of the most impactful exercises a runner can add to his or her weight training routine because it targets so many muscles. It helps improve core stability and most importantly, it increases the strength of your glutes, hamstrings and quads. The deadlift can be an intimidating exercise that most gym-goers don’t really know how to perform. It looks painful on the back but if you perform the deadlift correctly, you will get stronger.

To be able to do a deadlift correctly, you need to be able to perform a hip hinge. This movement requires flexion at the hips with no change in the lumbar spine curve—it must remain neutral throughout the exercise. If you can’t perform a deadlift with a neutral spine, you shouldn’t be performing deadlifts.

SUBSCRIBE: Get A FREE Subscription To Competitor’s Digital Magazine!

Load a barbell so that it sits roughly 9 inches off the ground—45-pound plates or lighter bumper plates (they have the same diameter). To perform a conventional deadlift, stand with your feet hip-width apart. Crouch down and grab the bar with a double overhand grip to the outside of your shins. Keep most of the weight on your heels and push your hips back and chest out. Pin your shoulders back and feel a neutral curve in your low back. Roll the bar close to your shins, which should be almost vertical at this point. Brace your abs and tighten your upper back muscles (e.g. latissimus dorsi) to anchor your shoulders in place. Stand with the bar by simultaneously extending your knees and hips. Finish the lift by standing tall with your butt squeezed tight. Do not lean back excessively or hyperextend your lower back. Soften your knees, slide the bar down your thighs and once you pass your knees, sit the bar back to the floor. Place the bar on the ground and reset your body position in preparation for the next repetition.

If you cannot achieve the neutral spine position, you might have to widen your stance. Try standing with your feet just wider than shoulder-width apart. Keep all the cues the same as in the previous set up (conventional deadlift), but grab the bar on the inside of your knees. If you still cannot achieve a neutral spine with that stance (medium sumo deadlift), widen your feet even more—just over double shoulder-width apart (called sumo stance). This time however, turn your feet roughly 45 degrees laterally and push your knees out. The remaining cues are the same.

If you’ve tried all three stances, raise the bar closer to your hips. First try placing the bar on thick plates (about 2-3 inches). Try the conventional, medium sumo and sumo stances and see if anything works. If you still can’t achieve the neutral spine position, you need to start with the bar even higher. Go into a squat rack and place the barbell just below knee height. Attempt all three stances again and see what works for you.

I recommend 5 repetitions or less for one set of deadlifts. Perform 3-5 sets, slowly adding weight to each set. Runners should deadlift once a week. Good luck!

****

About The Author:

Jon-Erik Kawamoto, MSc, CSCS is a runner, strength coach and owner of JKConditioning in St. John’s, NL, Canada. Jon specializes in strength training distance runners and is currently in the middle of preparing a strength training resource for runners. Stay in touch by checking out www.StrongerRunner.com and www.JKConditioning.com.

The post Coach’s Corner: Troubleshooting The Deadlift appeared first on Competitor.com.

]]>
http://running.competitor.com/2014/08/training/coachs-corner-troubleshooting-deadlift_112262/feed 0