Competitor.com http://running.competitor.com Your Online Source for Running Thu, 27 Nov 2014 20:23:11 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 Beer & Running: A Running Store With 20 Beer Taps http://running.competitor.com/2014/11/video/beer-running-running-store-20-beer-taps_118734 http://running.competitor.com/2014/11/video/beer-running-running-store-20-beer-taps_118734#comments Wed, 26 Nov 2014 18:37:58 +0000 http://running.competitor.com/?p=118734

Seriously? A running store that serves craft beer? Yes, seriously!

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Seriously? A running store that serves craft beer? Yes, seriously!

Shoes & Brews opened in Longmont, Colo., in late July as the first full-fledged beer and running operation in the U.S. There are a handful of bike shops in the U.S. with single beer taps and have been a few high-end denim stores that serve beer to its shoppers. Many running shops have happy hour runs and offer post-run beers, and there are also many breweries with an interest in running—including brew pubs that host regular group runs or produce running-themed beers—but Shoes & Brews is a one of a kind in the running world.

Shoes & Brews is a full-service running store with an artfully designed shoe wall and all the apparel, accessories and nutritional items you’d find at any running shop. But this store also has 20 microbrew taps serving up good beer from the best breweries along Colorado’s Front Range. In what should come as no surprise, it was started by a group of enterprising runners (including three former collegiate runners) who have an inkling for craft beer.

“Shoes and Brews is a business built on two passions coming together—running and beer,” says Ashlee Velez, one of the founders of the business. “It’s all about being a social runner and a social beer drinker under one roof.”

RELATED: How to Run a Beer Mile

Technically, the store and bar are two separate operations (both physically and financially), but they’re under the same roof and share a logo. (The logo was designed by Boulder graphic artist Jason Simpson, a 1:12 half-marathoner and husband of world champion 1500m runner Jenny Simpson.) The two sides of the business are connected by a door in the middle of a short hallway, but runners and beer drinkers are free to visit either side at any time.

So far the businesses are off to a good start, partially because it’s the only running specialty store between Boulder and Fort Collins. The store’s Thursday night group runs along St. Vrain Creek Path have become pretty popular and, as a result, the tap room part of the business often has an inordinate amount of people drinking quality beer in skimpy shorts or brightly colored spandex clothes. It also hosts Saturday morning runs and recently co-hosted a 5K run with Left Hand Brewing Company just down the creek path.

RELATED: The 2014 Beer Mile World Championships

While there’s no pressure to be either a beer drinker or a runner at Shoes & Brews, the proprietors definitely do their best to spread their passions in a fun, low-key environment. The Thursday night runs often have running gear giveaways or a special presentation by local running coaches or running groups.

But the best integration of beer and running at Shoes & Brews is the opportunity to run an 800-meter time trial to determine the price of your first beer. In other words if you run a 3:30 half-mile, you pay $3.30 for your first pint. If you can run 2:58, then you pay $2.58. And yes, there have been a few runners who have paid some pretty cheap prices for their first beer.

Local resident Billy Nelson, a 2008 U.S. Olympic steeplechase runner, owns the current Shoes & Brews record with the 1:57.1 that he ran on the store’s opening weekend—an effort that earned everyone a round of $1.57 beers.

“What a fun event,” Nelson says. “Good thing I didn’t run 3 seconds slower or it would have had been 43 cents more!”

RELATED: NYC Marathon—5 Boroughs, 5 Beers

 

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Beer & Running: The 2014 Beer Mile World Championships http://running.competitor.com/2014/11/news/beer-running-2014-beer-mile-world-championships_118733 http://running.competitor.com/2014/11/news/beer-running-2014-beer-mile-world-championships_118733#comments Wed, 26 Nov 2014 17:13:34 +0000 http://running.competitor.com/?p=118733

World-class middle-distance runner Nick Symmonds offers his insights and tips to the first beer mile world championships on Dec. 3. Photo: John Jefferson

Nick Symmonds offers some beer mile tips before the Dec. 3 FloTrack Beer Mile World Championships

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World-class middle-distance runner Nick Symmonds offers his insights and tips to the first beer mile world championships on Dec. 3. Photo: John Jefferson

World-class middle-distance runner Nick Symmonds offers his insights and tips to the first beer mile world championships on Dec. 3. Photo: John Jefferson

World-class middle-distance runner Nick Symmonds offers his insights and tips to the first beer mile world championships on Dec. 3. Photo: John Jefferson

The inaugural Flotrack Beer Mile World Championships will be held on Dec. 3 in Austin, Texas.

Long before Canadian James Nielsen broke the 5-minute barrier and set a new world record last April, the beer mile had already foamed over its previous cult-like interest among hardcore runners. Previously a gratuitously silly and ridiculously fun event staged by running clubs and college cross-country teams, the beer mile has gone viral as fleet-footed beer guzzlers post their efforts on social media outlets in the past couple of years. Nielsen’s 4:57.1 solo effort on a track in Novato, Calif., was the tipping point that sent #beermile trending around the world with more than 1.3 million views on YouTube (as of Nov. 25).

Beer miles are contested among small groups all over the world and the results are tracked on the Beer Mile website. This past summer, the crew at FloTrack got the idea to put together a world championship beer mile. The inaugural FloTrack Beer Mile World Championship will be held at Yellow Jacket Stadium in Austin, Texas, at about 7 p.m. on Dec. 3.

“I’ve been training my butt off, both in the pub and on the track,” says Symmonds, who owns a 3:56.72 mile PR and the 5:19.0 U.S. record in the beer mile.

RELATED: James Nielsen—Beer Mile Legend

Along with Nielsen, who won two NCAA Division III titles in the 5,000-meter run while in college, and Symmonds, other top beer-milers expected to participate include Canadian Corey Gallagher (5:01.5), Australian Jack Colreavy (5:17.0) and Sweden’s Markus Liwing (5:24.3). Among the women are beer-mile world record-holder Chris Kimbrough (6:28.60) and Brooks pro Katie Mackey, a former University of Washington runner with a 4:27.78 PR in the “dry” mile.

“The athletes at the starting line on will be the best ever assembled for a Beer Mile, and I’m confident both world records will be broken,” says Mark Floreani, co-founder of FloTrack.

RELATED: How to Run a Beer Mile

Here are Symmonds’ tips for running a good beer mile:

1. Get Fit — “You need to be a good runner, but not a great runner,” says Symmonds, a five-time U.S. champion and 2013 world championships silver medalist in the 800-meter run. “But you have to be a great drinker.” Symmonds was injured for part of the 2014 season, but ran 1:51 for 800 meters in October.

2. Choose a Good Beer — “It needs to be at least 5 percent alcohol according to the rules, but there are both very heavy and very light beers in that category. You need one you can drink very fast,” says Symmonds, who says he doesn’t have a favorite beer-mile beer.

3. Train For It — “What slows everyone down is the carbonation. I try to get my beer settled and down to room temperature so I can get it down quickly,” says Symmonds, who has been practicing his beer-and-running routine on a treadmill and aiming to average between 8 and 10 seconds per beer.

VIDEO: Watch James Nielsen Break The Beer Mile World Record

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USA Mountain Running Championships Heading to Bend, Oregon http://running.competitor.com/2014/11/news/usa-mountain-running-championships-heading-bend-oregon_118788 http://running.competitor.com/2014/11/news/usa-mountain-running-championships-heading-bend-oregon_118788#comments Wed, 26 Nov 2014 07:56:05 +0000 http://running.competitor.com/?p=118788 The race will be on the west coast for the first time in its history.

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The 2015 USA Mountain Running Championships will be held in Bend, Oregon, the USA Track & Field’s Mountain Ultra Trail Executive Committee unanimously decided. The event will take place on July 25, 2015 at the Mt. Bachelor Ski Area.

It’s the first time the championships have been held outside of Colorado or New Hampshire. The 2014 race was at Loon Mountain, New Hampshire.

The 2015 event will feature a 4K loop course with approximately 800 feet of climbing. The course is mostly singletrack on the ascent with a short section of dirt road at the top of the loop and a mix of singletrack and dirt road on the descent.

Women will run two loops, men three loops. There will be separate starts for the men and women, and also a citizen’s race of one loop.

The 2015 race in Bend will be the lone selection race for the U.S. Mountain Running Team where the top six men and top four women to finish will earn berths to compete at the 2015 World Mountain Running Championships in September in Wales.

The Bend race will also double as the second annual Collegiate Running Association Mountain Running Championships.

MORE: Endurance Sportswire

 

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Yoga for Runners: The Pigeon Pose http://running.competitor.com/2014/11/video/yoga-runners-pigeon-pose_118737 http://running.competitor.com/2014/11/video/yoga-runners-pigeon-pose_118737#comments Wed, 26 Nov 2014 06:40:04 +0000 http://running.competitor.com/?p=118737

This pose is great for improve the range-of-motion and flexibility in your hips, which will in turn lead to better running form.

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This pose is great for improve the range-of-motion and flexibility in your hips, which will in turn lead to better running form.

RELATED: Yoga for Runners: The Crescent Lunge

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Beer & Running: Brewing up a Runner’s Dream http://running.competitor.com/2014/11/news/beer-running-brewing-runners-dream_118808 http://running.competitor.com/2014/11/news/beer-running-brewing-runners-dream_118808#comments Tue, 25 Nov 2014 21:43:46 +0000 http://running.competitor.com/?p=118808

10 Barrel Brewing Co. founders Jeremy and Chris Cox are avid runners. Their brew pub has a running club that meets between every morning and often includes several employees. Photo: Courtesy of 10 Barrel Brewing Co.

10 Barrel Brewing in Bend, Ore. was founded by sibling runners According to many runners, the best way to end a run is with an ice-cold

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10 Barrel Brewing Co. founders Jeremy and Chris Cox are avid runners. Their brew pub has a running club that meets between every morning and often includes several employees. Photo: Courtesy of 10 Barrel Brewing Co.

10 Barrel Brewing in Bend, Ore. was founded by sibling runners

According to many runners, the best way to end a run is with an ice-cold beer, which is why the lives of Jeremy and Chris Cox, 36, should be the envy of runners everywhere. The identical twin brothers and running buddies co-own the rapidly growing Bend, Ore.-based 10 Barrel Brewing Co., and most often the brothers’ days begin with running and end with beer.

“I get up early in the morning, leave the house at 6:30 to meet my brother, run 4 to 8 miles and then to head into work to start working and drinking — the drinking is not as bad as it sounds,” says Jeremy Cox, with a laugh about the beer tasting required in his line of work.

And while Cox is quick to point out that he doesn’t drink as much beer as it might appear during the work week, his post-run Monday meetings are a lot more ‘lighthearted’ than they are for the rest of us – they involve, well, beer. “We do drink more than is common,” Cox says.

The 240 brewery employees also run a lot more than is common.

“Most of the employees here are runners,” Chris Cox says. “Our brew pub has a running club that meets between 7-7:30 a.m., and a lot of people run from the pub every morning—there’s usually between 10 and 20 people running together.”

VIDEO: A Running Store With 20 Beer Taps

The Cox brothers also put together a relay team for this month’s Cascade Lakes Relay, a 200-plus-mile overnight relay that ends in Bend.

Most of the runners on the team work at the brewery, which also serves as one of the craft beer sponsors at the finish line. Jeremy Cox says the brewery’s involvement in Bend’s endurance scene is all part of owning a business in Bend, which is renowned for its residents’ love for all things outdoors.

“It sort of fits well with everybody’s brand here in central Oregon,” Jeremy says. His brewery sponsors about three endurance or outdoor events every month.

RELATED: How Beer And Running Intersect Naturally, being twin brothers who work and run together can create a little competition. The brothers grew up playing sports together and grew to love running after they graduated from college. And while Chris will tell you that he’s not competitive enough to win races, he’s “overly competitive in spirit” when it comes to beating his brother.

“Every once in a while we’ll sneak in a run without telling the other one, to get an advantage, especially if there’s a race coming up,” Chris admits.

READ MORE: How to Run a Beer Mile

When asked to consider who is a better runner for this story, Jeremy says he and Chris got into a fight about it but concluded, “It switches back and forth, who usually wins.”

Chris has a slightly different story. He admits that Jeremy is better on hills, but the race winner often depends on who has trained more. Then he pauses for a second and says, “I’m a better runner than him — I’m faster.” Faster? Maybe. Living every runner’s dream? Certainly.

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Morganne Hockett: The Day I Qualified for Boston http://running.competitor.com/2014/11/saucony-26-strong/morganne-hockett-day-qualified-boston_118690 http://running.competitor.com/2014/11/saucony-26-strong/morganne-hockett-day-qualified-boston_118690#comments Tue, 25 Nov 2014 20:00:43 +0000 http://running.competitor.com/?p=118690

Morganne Hockett qualified for Boston last year in her second marathon.

Morganne Hockett recalls the 2013 race in which she earned a Boston Marathon qualifying time.

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Morganne Hockett qualified for Boston last year in her second marathon.

I completed my first marathon in January 2013, which was a leap for me. I had been comfortable with half marathons, and finally decided to do the full. When I completed my first marathon in less than 4 hours, I completely surprised myself. It didn’t take long for me to catch the marathon bug. Three months later, I signed up for my second full marathon.

I thought Richmond was perfect. It was in November, fall weather, on a Saturday, and not too far from home. As the marathon crept closer and my training weeks were dwindling down, I started getting nervous. I had set a goal for myself that I only had shared with my dad and my husband: to qualify for Boston.

The morning of the race, I felt ready. I had put my training runs in and knew that I could finish. I started with four main goals: to finish, feel good, sub-4 hours, and to PR. Of course, all the stars had to align for me to have a Boston qualifying time of 3:35:00, so I simply had it on the back of my mind.

As we began driving to the start line, it started raining. The stars were quickly not falling into place for me. Fortunately, it had slowed down by the time of the start, but it would continue raining on and off for those 26.2 miles.

I started off and was right on pace: first mile, 8:26, second mile, 7:57. I started second guessing myself that I was starting off too fast and would end up regretting it at mile 20, but I was feeling good. Once I hit mile 10, I once again doubted my pace and myself. I had consistently had about an 8:00 minute pace up until that point, but I still had 16 miles to go. Would I be able to keep it up?

When I got to mile 19, I wanted to jump up and down, scream, and give hugs and kisses to my spectators. They were standing out in the rain, cheering me on and giving me all the support and extra pushes I needed to keep going. I told them I’d see them at the finish, and I was off. From here, I was on my own. 7.2 miles remained. At mile 22 I met up with the 3:35 pace group and convinced myself that I could not let them pass me. I thought about my family and kept pushing. I saw the mile 25 marker and picked up my pace as much as I could. Then it was downhill. Literally, it was downhill. I could see the finish line and heard spectators yelling my name. The hill got steeper and I thought I was going to tumble into the finish so I had to slow down.

Then I crossed the finish. The clock read 3:34, while my watch read 3:33. I instantly was overcome with emotion. Tears of joy rolled down my face. My family was going to be so proud of me. I was proud of what I had accomplished. It was a moment that I will never forget.

For more on the Saucony 26 Strong program, which pairs up 13 coaches with 13 marathon rookies, visit 26Strong.com.

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The Everyman: I’m Thankful For … http://running.competitor.com/2014/11/staff-blog/the-everyman-im-thankful-for_118678 http://running.competitor.com/2014/11/staff-blog/the-everyman-im-thankful-for_118678#comments Tue, 25 Nov 2014 19:51:32 +0000 http://running.competitor.com/?p=118678

As runners, how can we not be thankful for this? Photo: Jason Devaney

What are you thankful for this Thanksgiving?

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As runners, how can we not be thankful for this? Photo: Jason Devaney

What are you thankful for this Thanksgiving?

Thanksgiving is here, so it’s time for another one of those “I am thankful for __” stories.

Here’s my list, tailored toward my amateur athletic pursuits:

Health

Having the health to compete in races and push myself is most definitely something to be thankful for. Injuries are one thing, but serious illnesses and diseases are something entirely different. Being able to run and bike and swim without worry is a blessing.

Family And Friends

I wouldn’t be an amateur athlete without the family and friends I work out with and draw support from. Group rides and runs are the best, and swim workouts are made easier with my wife or other members of our circle.

Technology

From high-tech fabrics to electronic gadgets that keep track of our pace, heart rate, cadence, distance traveled and so many other pieces of data, endurance sports seem to get easier and easier. All we have to do is swim, bike or run—everything else is taken care of. Kind of. You know what I mean.

RELATED: 5 Things You Didn’t Know About Turkey Trots

Lots Of Options

There are so many races out there that there’s really no excuse not to compete, particularly in running. There’s a race every weekend. Whether you’re a 5K runner, a long-distance athlete or something in between, you’ve got plenty of options. I challenge you to finish reading this story and then go sign up for a race.

Turkey Trots

It’s true, I’m thankful for the annual Thanksgiving Day races across the United States. How else am I going to eat all that food? At the very least, I’ll hopefully go into Thanksgiving dinner at a calorie deficit for the day.

What are you thankful for in your running life? Tweet me @jason_devaney1.

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The 25 Greatest Running Movies Ever http://running.competitor.com/2014/11/lists/25-greatest-running-movies-ever_118584 http://running.competitor.com/2014/11/lists/25-greatest-running-movies-ever_118584#comments Tue, 25 Nov 2014 19:30:46 +0000 http://running.competitor.com/?p=118584 The post The 25 Greatest Running Movies Ever appeared first on Competitor.com.

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The Greatest Running Movies: Honorable Mention http://running.competitor.com/2014/11/features/greatest-running-movies-honorable-mention_118620 http://running.competitor.com/2014/11/features/greatest-running-movies-honorable-mention_118620#comments Tue, 25 Nov 2014 19:27:52 +0000 http://running.competitor.com/?p=118620

Volcanic Sprint (2007). Photo courtesy of Steve Dorst.

When it comes to great running movies, documentaries and videos, there are dozens that didn’t make the cut.

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Volcanic Sprint (2007). Photo courtesy of Steve Dorst.

When it comes to great running movies, documentaries and videos, there are dozens more that didn’t make the cut on our list of the 25 greatest running movies. Here are 20 more good running films worth viewing.

“Jim Thorpe: All-American” (1951) — This Warner Brothers film about Native American athlete and 1912 Olympic decathlon champion Jim Thorpe stars Burt Lancaster.

“Second Wind” (1976) — A story about a successful family man who is inspired by Olympic champion runner Kip Keino and takes up running as a hobby only to interrupt the balance of life and family.

“The Loneliest Runner” (1976) — A made-for-TV autobiographical film starring Michael Landon.

“The Terry Fox Story” (1983) — A true story about a Canadian cancer amputee who decides to run across Canada on one leg to raise money for cancer research.

“The Long Run” (2000) — A story about a washed-up coach who takes on an unlikely runner and coaches her for the Comrades Marathon in South Africa.

“A Race for The Soul” (2001) — A riveting documentary on the Western States 100.

“Lady Warriors” (2002) — A solid documentary on the girls cross-country program in Tuba City, Ariz.

“The Great American Footrace” (2002) — This film documents a 3,422-mile cross-country trek in 1928 won by 19-year-old Cherokee Indian Andy Payne.

“Five Thousand Meters: Nothing Comes Easy” (2004) — A documentary that follows several top U.S. runners, including Adam Goucher, Tim Broe and Jorge Torres, in their quest to make it to the U.S. Olympic Trials.

“Four Minutes” (2005) — The ESPN production of the story behind Roger Bannister’s quest to run the world’s first sub-4-minute mile.

“Runners High” (2006) — This documentary tells the story of four young teens in a program called “Students Run Oakland” and their quest to run the Los Angeles Marathon.

“The Athlete” (2009) — A film directed by Davey Frankel and Rasselas Lakew that focuses on the final years of double Olympic marathon champion Abede Bikila’s life.

“Fast Women” (2010) — A film that follows four women marathoners from the same local running club in their quest to run in the 2008 U.S. Olympic Trials Marathon.

“Running the Sahara” (2007) — This Matt Damon-narrated film follows Charlie Engle, Ray Zahab and Kevin Lin as they run across the Sahara Desert of Northern Africa.

“Volcanic Sprint” (2007) — A compelling film about the Cameroon Race of Hope up and down a 10,000-foot live volcano.

“UltraMarathon Man: 50 Marathons, 50 States, 50 Days” (2008) — This movie from J.B. Benna depicts Dean Karnazes’ epic quest to run 50 marathons in 50 days in every state of the U.S. in 2007.

“The Robber” (2010) — The true story of Australian marathoner Johann Rettenberger, who robbed small banks and literally ran away as his means of escape.

“Town of Runners” (2012) — A documentary about the rural Ethiopian town of Bekoji, which is home to legendary champions Tirunesh Dibaba and Kenenisa Bekele and dozens of aspiring young runners trying to follow in their footsteps.

“The Last Mile” (2013) — A film from John Burkett that tries to answer the question of why we run through the input and profiles of a variety of runners.

“In the High Country” (2013) — The best work yet of running filmmaker Joel Wolpert, this short film profiles American ultrarunner Anton Krupicka.

“Running the Edge: The Colorado Trail” (2014) — Matt Trappe’s debut film profiles Scott Jaime’s record-setting run on the Colorado Trail.

“Western Time” (2014) — A compelling video from Billy Yang Films about Sally McCrae’s strong performance at the 2014 Western States 100.

“Usain Bolt: The Fastest Man Alive” (2014) — An engaging documentary on Jamaican sprinting legend Usain Bolt.

 

RELATED: At the Movies: Memorable Running Scenes

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At The Movies: Memorable Running Scenes http://running.competitor.com/2014/11/news/movies-memorable-running-scenes_118634 http://running.competitor.com/2014/11/news/movies-memorable-running-scenes_118634#comments Tue, 25 Nov 2014 19:26:19 +0000 http://running.competitor.com/?p=118634

The Rocky steps are now a tourist attraction in Philadelphia.

Here are 10 mainstream movies with memorable running scenes.

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The Rocky steps are now a tourist attraction in Philadelphia.

Here are 10 mainstream movies with memorable running scenes.

As part of our list of the 25 Greatest Running Movies Ever, we decided to take a look at memorable running scenes in movies that weren’t exactly running movies. Here are a few of our favorites:

“Rocky II” (1976) — What’s not to like about Rocky Balboa’s epic training run through Philadelphia? It’s an iconic scene that probably helped solidify the Rocky franchise in American movie lore. Well, OK, it might have been as long as 30 miles if he’d actually run the exact course depicted in the movie. But that just means the Italian Stallion is a prize fighter and an ultrarunner.

“Raiders of the Lost Ark” (1981) — There might not have been any sequels to this series of adventure-based films had Indiana Jones (Harrison Ford) not outrun that big rolling bolder in the forbidden cave. Indy survives, of course, and so does his quest for the ark of the covenant.

“Rocky III” (1982) — In what might the one of the worst running scenes in movie history, Rocky Balboa (Sylvester Stallone) runs what appears to be a 50-yard sprint on the beach alongside Apollo Creed (Carl Weathers). The point is apparently to show that Balboa has improved his speed while preparing for his rematch with James “Clubber” Lang (Mr. T), but the slow-motion frames show that Balboa is going all-out and is still having trouble keeping up with Creed, who appears to be running barely above jogging pace.

“The Last of the Mohicans” (1992) — Daniel Day Lewis is one of the premier actors of his era, but he also appears to be pretty fit while trail running through many scenes of this film, especially in the opening segment filmed with moving cameras.

“Forrest Gump” (1994) — “Run, Forrest, Run!” is about all you need to say about this. What didn’t Forrest Gump (Tom Hanks) do in his rich life? As a shaggy-faced hippie, Gump started the running boom in the early 1970s. And then one day, just like that, he decided to stop running.

Run Lola Run” (1998) — This German crime thriller depicts the main character’s attempt to find 100,000 Deutschmarks and run across town in 20 minutes to save her boyfriend before he robs a supermarket.

“Old School” (2003) — “We’re going streaking!” After a drunk and naked Frank the Tank (Will Ferrell) interrupts Snoop Dogg’s backyard concert, he decides to lead “everyone” on a drunken dash across the quad and down main street, only to run alongside his wife in her minivan.

“Collateral” (2004) — Tom Cruise has made a career out of running in movies and this scene—which takes him up and down several flights of stairs, through two buildings and across a parking garage—is one of his best. In all Cruise can be found running in 19 movies. (Plus, he was the producer of “Without Limits,” the 1998 film about Steve Prefontaine.)

“Casino Royale” (2006) — As far as chase scenes go, few can match the parkour-inspired getaway attempt by a villain with James Bond (Daniel Craig) in hot pursuit at the start of this “007″ thriller. The chase runs through a construction site, up ladders, across steel girders, along a large crane platform several stories off the ground, down an elevator shaft, through traffic and eventually into the Nambutu Embassy.

“Silver Linings Playbook” (2012) — Lead characters Pat (Bradley Cooper) and Tiffany (Jennifer Lawrence) play out a funny running scene in this romantic comedy. Pat, wearing a garbage bag (with arm holes cut out) over his gray hoody, tries to outrun Tiffany, but she’s persistent and takes a short cut, allowing for a key interaction between the two characters.

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Why Meb Should Be The 2014 Sports Illustrated Sportsman of the Year http://running.competitor.com/2014/11/news/meb-2014-sports-illustrated-sportsman-year_118643 http://running.competitor.com/2014/11/news/meb-2014-sports-illustrated-sportsman-year_118643#comments Tue, 25 Nov 2014 19:00:12 +0000 http://running.competitor.com/?p=118643

Meb is one of the most consistent runners in the long history of the sport. One of the smartest. One of the gutsiest. In fact, he's the only person of either gender and of any nationality to win the Boston Marathon, New York City Marathon and an Olympic Marathon medal. Photo: PhotoRun.net

Meb Keflezighi is one of the nominee for Sports Illustrated's Sportsman of the Year. Here's a case for him winning it.

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Meb is one of the most consistent runners in the long history of the sport. One of the smartest. One of the gutsiest. In fact, he's the only person of either gender and of any nationality to win the Boston Marathon, New York City Marathon and an Olympic Marathon medal. Photo: PhotoRun.net

Full disclosure: I am Meb Keflezighi’s brother and business manager. I am biased. While I do have a unique perspective into the man that is Meb and the significance of his Boston Marathon victory in 2014, I know my assessment and understanding of Meb is supported by thousands, if not millions, of people who have been inspired by his championship performances and character. Through my observations of Meb’s interaction with these people, I have come to understand and appreciate his most valuable asset, his ability to inspire through his journey as a sportsman.

To the decision makers for Sports Illustrated Sportsman of the Year:

As graduates of UCLA, both Meb and I are big fans of former Bruins basketball coach John Wooden and his Pyramid of Success. At the top of the pyramid is Competitive Greatness. Next to those words, it says, “Be at your best when your best is needed.”

At this year’s Boston Marathon, Meb was at his absolute best when it was needed most. As with every race he enters, Meb put a lot of pressure on himself to win on April 21, 2014. But this time, Meb’s motivation was far beyond achieving victory for himself or his sponsors. Meb was pursuing victory to pay tribute to Martin, Krystle, Lingzi and Sean—the victims who lost their lives due to the Boston Marathon bombings. Meb was running to bring joy back to the people of Boston. Meb was seeking victory to reclaim the finish line for the global community, runners and non-runners alike. Meb carried that pressure in his heart and allowed it to fuel his visualization, training and race execution. Meb was inspired to think, train and race for a victory, not for himself—but a victory for goodness and humanity. It was important to our nation and to the world for the 118th running of the Boston Marathon to take place after the bombings the year before, but for the first of 36,000 finishers to be Meb was better than any writer could script. Rarely is there an opportunity where an athletic performance can transcend sport, and seldom is that opportunity grasped in front of 1.5 million spectators and broadcast live to hundreds of millions of people around the world.

Coach Wooden, a former Sports Illustrated Sportsman of the Year awardee himself, is someone Meb and I have had the honor to meet numerous times and whom we respect for all of his achievements in sports and the way he carried himself in all aspects of his life. Meb’s “Run To Win” philosophy is derived from his understanding and appreciation of Coach Wooden’s definition of success: Peace of mind, which is a direct result of self-satisfaction in knowing you did your best to become the best you are capable of becoming. For Meb, “Run To Win” doesn’t always mean getting first place, it means getting the best out of yourself.

Meb has lived out this philosophy over the course of his entire career. He has gotten the best out of himself time and time again when it’s mattered most: earning the silver medal in the marathon at the 2004 Olympics in Athens, winning the 2009 New York City Marathon, winning the U.S. Olympic Trials Marathon in 2012 and finishing fourth at the 2012 Olympic marathon in London. This year’s Boston Marathon provided the opportunity for the entire world to witness the essence of Meb. In a true sportsman, I think the character of a champion is more important than his victories. When Meb stepped to the starting line of this year’s Boston Marathon, many other runners had run faster marathons than him. But Meb’s motivation on that day was singular and selfless. Meb has made a career out of getting the best out of himself, but from April 13, 2013 to April 21, 2014, he was driven to be at his best for much more than himself, and amazingly, he accomplished this noble mission.

When I look at the list of past recipients of the S.I. Sportsman of the Year award, I barely remember a specific individual performance, but rather the power of an athletic achievement to transcend a sport. In my mind, this prestigious award isn’t just about a significant sports moment; it’s more about the commitment to athletic excellence and sportsmanship an athlete displays throughout their career, which is sometimes only recognized retroactively because of a shining moment or season.

Some people have compared Meb’s win to the 1980 Miracle on Ice, a true honor given that moment’s impact on America’s sporting and social landscape. Among the running community, I think Meb’s performance will have a similar impact as Joan Benoit Samuelson’s gold medal performance at the 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles, the first Olympic marathon in which women were allowed to compete. Similar to Joanie’s performances, I believe, there are life lessons for all of us in Meb’s journey and victory. Meb is not the most dominant marathoner in the world, but he’s shown he is one of the most consistent runners in the long history of the sport. One of the smartest. One of the gutsiest. In fact, Meb is the only person of either gender and of any nationality to win the Boston Marathon, New York City Marathon and an Olympic marathon medal.

Whether you’re a runner, a student or an employee, Meb’s story is evidence that you don’t need to be the most talented person in your profession in order to achieve success. You just need to make smart decisions, work hard, be consistent and surround yourself with a good team. If you do those things enough times you’ll have the opportunity to realize “success” and “win” in life.

In Meb’s case, winning the Boston Marathon, breaking a 31-year American dry spell when it mattered most, shows his true character and what he’s been doing for 16 years as a professional. The Boston Marathon victory was a culmination of Meb’s achievements and a moving display of the work ethic, toughness and character that has inspired and motivated so many people. Winning the Boston Marathon or any of his other achievements in running present just a partial glimpse into Meb’s character. On the Friday night before one the biggest races of his life, Meb made it a point to meet with the family of Martin Richard, the youngest victim of the 2013 Boston Marathon bombings, and on behalf of the MEB Foundation, donated $10,000 to the foundation set up in memory and in honor of Martin.

In closing, I have grown from respecting Meb as a great athlete, brother and client, to the gradual realization that he is one of the greatest sportsmen of our time. Similar to previous recipients of this award, including our friends Rafer Johnson, John Wooden, Kip Keino, Jim Ryun, and the likes of Arthur Ashe, Cal Ripken Jr., David Robinson, Tim Duncan, Derek Jeter, Payton Manning, and coach Mike Krzyzewski, Meb has achieved the highest honors in his sport, but he has used this platform to inspire people to get the best out of themselves. While all of the 20 or so athletes in contention for this year’s award are truly worthy of the honor, I believe the S.I. Sportsman of the Year transcends just one performance. It’s not about the performance, but the impact of the performance and performer on others. In my nine years working as Meb’s manager, I have seen him touch thousands of people, one handshake, autograph, smile, interaction and selfie at a time. On April 21, 2014, Meb touched millions of lives with one performance, by doing what he’s always done: Running To Win!

I share this letter with you today, not because I am Meb’s brother and manager, but because I have the fortune, honor and privilege of being the brother and manager of one of the greatest sportsmen of our generation—an athlete who has consistently been at his best when his best was needed, not only needed for his own good, but for the good of his team, our sport, our country and our society.

Sincerely,

Hawi Keflezighi

Editor’s Note: The editor of Time Inc. Sports Group and the editor of Sports Illustrated will make the final selection for Sportsman of the Year, which will be announced in December. As part of the lead-in to that announcement, SI.com is publishing a series of about 20 nominating essays, mostly by the magazine’s staff writers. Sports Illustrated senior writer Tim Layden nominated Meb Keflezighi for the award. You can read that essay here

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Photos: 2014 Janus Rock ‘n’ Roll Denver Marathon & 1/2 Marathon http://running.competitor.com/2014/11/photos/photos-wacker-arendt-win-colorado-state-half-marathon-championships_116241 http://running.competitor.com/2014/11/photos/photos-wacker-arendt-win-colorado-state-half-marathon-championships_116241#comments Tue, 25 Nov 2014 17:19:08 +0000 http://running.competitor.com/?p=116241

 

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Turkey Trots by the Numbers http://running.competitor.com/2014/11/photos/turkey-trots-numbers_118538 http://running.competitor.com/2014/11/photos/turkey-trots-numbers_118538#comments Tue, 25 Nov 2014 16:01:11 +0000 http://running.competitor.com/?p=118538

Photo: Rich Cruse

Just how big have Turkey Trots gotten? These numbers may surprise you.

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Photo: Rich Cruse

Why have Turkey Trots come so far? Rich Harshbarger, CEO of Running USA, knows the answer.

“Turkey Trots are the original theme runs,” he says. “So many of these events, regardless of distance, also have ties to food banks, homeless shelters and other related charity programs that tug at heartstrings. Often, families use the holiday season to get their children involved, and family fun runs are a great outlet for that. It’s also not a bad way to burn some extra calories after a large second helping!”

Turkey Trots have been a tradition for a long time—the Buffalo YMCA Turkey Trot started in 1895!—but only recently has the tradition exploded into a nation-wide happening.

Just how much has it grown? In 2013, more than 3.4 million miles were run by Americans on Thanksgiving Day. And the weather isn’t getting in the way—while California leads the way in Turkey Trot participation, cold-weather states like Ohio, Michigan, Pennsylvania and New York aren’t far behind.

Check out some of the numbers related to Thanksgiving’s newest signature staple.

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Video: The Elongated Monty Python Walk http://running.competitor.com/2014/11/video/video-elongated-monty-python-walk_118624 http://running.competitor.com/2014/11/video/video-elongated-monty-python-walk_118624#comments Tue, 25 Nov 2014 00:50:22 +0000 http://running.competitor.com/?p=118624

This move, inspired by the "Silly Walk" Monty Python skit, actually acts as an active hamstring stretch and is a great warmup exercise.

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This move, inspired by the “Silly Walks” Monty Python skit, actually acts as an active hamstring stretch and is a great warmup exercise.

Do 2-4 sets of 10 reps with each leg to get your hamstrings ready to go.

RELATED: Hamstring Kickouts

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Begley to Coach Atlanta Track Club http://running.competitor.com/2014/11/news/begley-coach-atlanta-track-club_118574 http://running.competitor.com/2014/11/news/begley-coach-atlanta-track-club_118574#comments Mon, 24 Nov 2014 18:53:36 +0000 http://running.competitor.com/?p=118574

The 36-year-old will begin her new job Dec. 1 in Georgia's capital city.

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The 36-year-old will begin her new job Dec. 1 in Georgia’s capital city.

The Atlanta Track Club announced Monday it has hired Amy Begley to be its first full-time coach in the club’s 50-year history.

Begley, who competed in the 10,000 meters at the 2008 Olympics, has served as head coach of the University of Connecticut women’s cross-country team since last year. She will relocate to Atlanta with her husband, Andrew Begley, who will also work with the ATC’s 21,000 members starting Dec. 1.

The couple previously lived in Atlanta for a year when Andrew was a high school coach.

“I can’t wait to return to Georgia as head coach at Atlanta Track Club,” said Begley, 36. “I believe in the organization’s mission of improving health and wellness through running. This sport has had a profound impact on my life, and I am eager to pay it forward to club members of all ages and abilities.”

One of the ATC’s goals is to develop at least one male and one female Olympian by 2020.

RELATED: Begley On Running Gluten-Free

Begley was a 15-time All-American and two-time national champion at the University of Arkansas. In 2009, she placed sixth in the 10,000m at the IAAF World Championships—her time of 31 minutes, 13.78 seconds made her the eighth-fastest American woman in history.

She retired from her professional career last year with six national titles. In addition to her head coaching duties at UConn, Begley was also an assistant coach for the women’s track and field team.

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How Does CrossFit Endurance Help Train Runners? http://running.competitor.com/2014/11/training/crossfit-endurance-help-train-runners_118566 http://running.competitor.com/2014/11/training/crossfit-endurance-help-train-runners_118566#comments Mon, 24 Nov 2014 17:27:36 +0000 http://running.competitor.com/?p=118566

Runners can greatly benefit from CrossFit Endurance training, writes Brian MacKenzie. Photo: www.shutterstock.com

CrossFit Endurance athletes are healthy and strong, and can run injury-free, writes Brian MacKenzie.

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Runners can greatly benefit from CrossFit Endurance training, writes Brian MacKenzie. Photo: www.shutterstock.com

Adapted from the new book Unbreakable Runner by Brian MacKenzie and T.J. Murphy. Learn more at unbreakablerunner.com.

Most long-distance training plans adopt the standard Lydiard-based training model, which has high mileage as its cornerstone—the more miles, the better. There’s no disputing that Lydiard developed a pathway for success, which he described in detail in his book, . But is the high-mileage model the only way to the top? Or the healthiest?

Lydiard argued vehemently that it was, but not everyone agrees. For some, the risk of injury is not worth the benefits that high mileage bestows. For these runners, it makes more sense to make every step count than to take as many steps as possible.

Challenges to the Lydiard method did not start with MacKenzie. One of the first came in the 1980s from coach Peter Coe, who adopted a type of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) for his son, middle-distance runner Sebastian Coe. Their plan kept Seb’s total mileage under 50 miles per week and included fast 200-meter repeats with 30 seconds of recovery between the fast segments. They also included weight training movements and plyometric exercises in a routine that looked similar to the typical CrossFit workouts one might see in a gym today.

How did this renegade training method work out for Seb? He won four Olympic gold medals in the 1980s, including gold in the 1500 meters in both 1980 and 1984. He set eight outdoor and three indoor world records in middle-distance track events—including, in 1979, setting three world records in the space of 41 days. The world record he set in the 800 meters in 1981 remained unbroken until 1997.

Even Lydiard would have had to admit that this method worked out pretty well for Seb, despite his relatively light mileage totals. The HIIT approach has gone under the microscope as well, with scientists examining its influence on athletic performance. In a 1996 study, Izumi Tabata and his team tested the effects on athletes of 20 seconds of ultra-intense cycling followed by 10 seconds of rest, repeated eight times, for a total testing time of about 4 minutes. Athletes using this method performed four 4-minute workouts per week and added another day of steady-state, lower-intensity cycling.

RELATED: How Does CrossFit Endurance Benefit Runners?

By the end of the study, the athletes using the HIIT method had obtained gains similar to those seen in a group of athletes who did only steady-state training, five times per week. While the steady-state group had a higher VO2 max at the end, the HIIT group had started lower and gained more overall. These findings suggest that had all the athletes started at the same level, the HIIT-oriented group would have ended up with higher VO2 max scores. Also, only the Tabata group had gained anaerobic capacity benefits—meaning they had added not just endurance but also strength.

A 2009 study by Martin Gibala and a team at McMaster University in Canada also took a close look at HIIT. Their study on students incorporated a 3-minute warm-up, followed by 60 seconds of intense exercise and 75 seconds of rest, repeated for 8 to 12 cycles. The total workout time ranged from 20 to 29 minutes, with the students repeating the routine three times per week for two weeks.

By the end of the testing period, subjects using this method obtained similar adaptations to the control group that used a “much larger volume of traditional endurance training.” As the Gibala team concluded, “Given the markedly lower training volume in the sprint interval group, these data suggest that high-intensity interval training is a time-efficient strategy to increase skeletal muscle oxidative capacity and induce specific metabolic adaptations during exercise that are comparable to traditional endurance training.” In other words, with HIIT, you can get the same results as with high-volume training, but with less training.

RELATED: Brian MacKenzie’s New Way To Train

These examples illustrate a central idea behind MacKenzie’s program, which trades long aerobic runs for short, hard bouts of effort. But there is more to the CFE approach. CrossFit Endurance is not limited to incorporating HIIT-based training principles, although that is central to the program. The CFE approach takes a much broader view of fitness than did Lydiard, or even Peter Coe. At its core, the CFE program is about two words you do not hear much about in traditional programs: health and sustainability.

CrossFit Endurance also works on developing running skill, balance and flexibility. A CFE athlete also focuses on nutrition and mobility. Why? Because ultimately, a CFE athlete is not just someone who runs and races well; he or she is someone who is, first and foremost, healthy and strong. As a result, a CFE athlete can also run very well and continue to do so injury-free.

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Marathon Meb: Thoughts On Giving Thanks http://running.competitor.com/2014/11/inside-the-magazine/marathon-meb-thoughts-giving-thanks_118535 http://running.competitor.com/2014/11/inside-the-magazine/marathon-meb-thoughts-giving-thanks_118535#comments Mon, 24 Nov 2014 16:19:28 +0000 http://running.competitor.com/?p=118535

Meb Keflezighi is thankful for what he has done—and for what he can still do. Photo: www.photorun.net

Meb Keflezighi is thankful for what running has brought to his life.

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Meb Keflezighi is thankful for what he has done—and for what he can still do. Photo: www.photorun.net

Meb Keflezighi is thankful for what running has brought to his life.

Recently I met a runner who told me he had broken his foot while getting ready for the Chicago Marathon, and because of his injury he wasn’t able to train and would have to miss the race. Understandably he was disappointed, but he also told me that if he hadn’t broken his foot, he wouldn’t have as much of an appreciation for the times that he was healthy and able to train hard. There’s a great lesson here that we can all learn from as runners: While we are all trying to improve, or run a personal best and get to that finish line as fast as we can, we can’t take for granted that we have good health and able bodies. Sometimes it takes a setback such as injury to be thankful for the times when everything is clicking and going smoothly.

It’s nice to be able to give thanks on the fourth Thursday of November, but it’s important to realize that every day is an opportunity to be thankful. Be thankful for the air you breathe, the food that’s on your table. Be thankful for the opportunity to run, whether it’s one mile, 10 miles or 15 miles. Often we take running for granted, and when it’s over we just move on with our day. After a run, I like to take a few minutes to be thankful for my health, beautiful surroundings and the opportunity to inspire others through the gifts that have been given to me.

This year, Thanksgiving will be extra special for me. In the months since I won Boston, a lot of people have come up to me and said, “Thank you. Thank you for what you have done.” They appreciate what I did for Boston and the United States on that day in April. For me, I feel that solidifies that I was put on this earth to touch people, to inspire them through running. I’ve achieved my personal goals of winning races and earning medals, but with Boston people are appreciative on a deeper level beyond victory, and that makes it extra meaningful to me.

MORE MARATHON MEB: Keep Pushing Forward

When I reflect on the life I have, I sometimes wonder what it would be like if I hadn’t left Eritrea and came to the United States as young boy. Every year at Thanksgiving I’m thankful for the opportunities my country has given me—for my family, my kids, my health and what I’ve been able to accomplish throughout my career. I’m thankful not just for what I have done, but for what I can still do.

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About The Author:

Meb Keflezighi is the only runner in history to win both the New York City Marathon and Boston Marathon and earn an Olympic medal. This is the first installment of his new “Marathon Meb” column for Competitor. Follow along each month in the magazine and also find regular training tips and inspiration at competitor.com/runmeb.

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Matt Llano Wins Big In Costa Rica http://running.competitor.com/2014/11/news/matt-llano-wins-big-costa-rica_118559 http://running.competitor.com/2014/11/news/matt-llano-wins-big-costa-rica_118559#comments Mon, 24 Nov 2014 05:36:28 +0000 http://running.competitor.com/?p=118559

Matt Llano leads Abdi Abdirahman and Ryan Hall in the early miles of the Gatorade San Jose Half Marathon. Photo: Courtesy of Gatorade San Jose Half Marathon

The American defeated Olympians Abdi Abdirahman and Ryan Hall at the Gatorade Half Marathon in San Jose.

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Matt Llano leads Abdi Abdirahman and Ryan Hall in the early miles of the Gatorade San Jose Half Marathon. Photo: Courtesy of Gatorade San Jose Half Marathon

The American defeated Olympians Abdi Abdirahman and Ryan Hall at the Gatorade Half Marathon in San Jose.

On Sunday, Matt Llano of Flagstaff, Ariz., showed why he is on track to become one of the next great American road racers, winning the second annual Gatorade San José Half Marathon in Costa Rica over U.S Olympians Ryan Hall and Abdi Abdirahman.

Llano made his presence known from the get-go, gradually pulling away from his countryman throughout the race to win easily in 1 hour, 5 minutes. “It’s an excellent competition,” Llano said. “The weather was a bit hard but I kept my pace all the way to the finish Line. I’m very happy to win the race.”

Ryan Hall, last year’s winner and the race’s current record holder, recovered from some physical problems earlier in the week and came in second with a time of 1:06:13. “I felt much better than I expected,” Hall said afterward. “I have not been on my physical peak these days but I managed to feel good to compete.” Four-time U.S. Olympian Abdi Abdirahman rounded out the podium in 1:08:08.

The real star of the competition was Hall’s wife, Sara, who won the women’s race with a mark never before seen in Costa Rica. She finished at 1:13:00 to finish fourth overall.

“This has been one of my best races,” Sara Hall said. “I was very close to my personal record in this race. I’m very happy and satisfied.”

Top-3 Male Finishers

1. Matt Llano (USA), 1:05:00

2. Ryan Hall (USA), 1:06:13

3. Abdi Abdirahman (USA), 1:08:08

Top-3 Female Finishers

1. Sara Hall (USA), 1:13:00

2. Jenny Mendez (CR), 1:18:16

3. Norma Rodriguez (CR), 1:24:24

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Max King Wins 100K World Championships, Leads U.S. To Team Title http://running.competitor.com/2014/11/news/max-king-wins-100k-world-championships_118547 http://running.competitor.com/2014/11/news/max-king-wins-100k-world-championships_118547#comments Sat, 22 Nov 2014 22:29:38 +0000 http://running.competitor.com/?p=118547

Max King won the IAU 100K World Championships on Nov. 21 in Doha, Qatar. It's the second world championship title of King's career. Photo: iRunFar.com

American runner Max King adds another world championship title to his racing résumé.

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Max King won the IAU 100K World Championships on Nov. 21 in Doha, Qatar. It's the second world championship title of King's career. Photo: iRunFar.com

Max King won the IAU 100K World Championships on Nov. 21 in Doha, Qatar. It's the second world championship title of King's career.

Max King won the IAU 100K World Championships on Nov. 21 in Doha, Qatar. It’s the second world championship title of King’s career.

American runner Max King adds another world championship title to his racing résumé.

Max King has been one of America’s best and most versatile distance runners for the past several years and he proved it again on Friday night in Doha, Qatar. The 34-year-old runner from Bend, Ore., won the IAAF-sanctioned IAU 100K World Championships, running the 20-lap, 62.1-mile course in 6 hours, 27 minutes, 43 seconds. King averaged 6:14 mile pace and broke Tom Johnson’s 19-year-old 100K U.S. record of 6:30:11. His efforts, along with those of Zach Bitter (6th, 6:48:53) and Zach Miller (9th, 6:51:30), gave the U.S. the team 100K world championship. Michael Wardian (28th, 7:19:00) and Nicholas Accardo (31st, 7:27:41) also ran well for the U.S. men’s team.

Ellie Greenwood, a Scottish-born UK runner who lives in Canada, won her second 100K IAU world title in 7:30:48. The top American women were Meghan Canfield Arbogast (8th, 7:52:12), Pam Reed (10th, 7:59:11) and Amy Sposton (19th, 8:14:02). The UK women won the team world championship, followed by runner-up Japan and the U.S. in third (after original third-place team Russia was DQ’ed).

The win was the second IAAF-sanctioned world title of King’s career, following his victory at the 2011 World Mountain Running Championships. In addition to those exploits, King has been a standout runner in events ranging from the 3,000-meter steeplechase on the track (he was sixth in the 2012 U.S. Olympic Trials), the marathon (he ran a PR 2:14:36 while placing 19th in the 2012 U.S. Olympic Trials) and ultra-distance races up to 100 miles (he placed fourth at this year’s Western States 100 in 15:44:45). He’s also won numerous U.S. national titles on the trail from 13.1 miles to 50 miles, as well as three XTERRA Trail Run World Championships. We caught up with King, who is sponsored by Montrail, Mountain Hardwear, Swiftwick, Gu Energy Labs and Flora Health, to get his insights about the race.

What was the course like?

It was a 6 p.m. race start to cut down on heat. It was really quite a nice temperature out for the race. A little warm, but perfect for me. The course was a contrived 5K loop consisting of a couple of out-an-backs. The surface was brutal, transitions from pavers to asphalt to tile made it a very hard race, literally.

How did the race play out? When did you make your break to the finish? When did you know the win was secure and when did you realize you were on American record pace?   

We had a great group running together through almost 50K. I surged, not really meaning to, at that point and got a little gap on the group that was already beginning to break apart. There was one Russian out front that I began to reel in over the next two laps then took the lead with about seven laps (35K) to go. From there, I was just running scared trying to put time on the chasers and keep a consistent pace. It wasn’t until about three laps to go (about 15K left) that I really thought I had a shot at the record as long as I maintained a reasonable pace.

How did you feel at various points in the race? Did you feel great the whole way? Or did you have rough patches? 

I felt really good through about 50k. At about that point, the hard surface started to get to me and my quads were starting to scream. I just hoped they didn’t get any worse and shut me down. Luckily they held up, but everything got worse with each lap after that. I was hurting pretty bad with about five laps (25K) to go and was just trying to hold it together. I started to count down the laps with about eight to go and couldn’t wait to be done. My energy levels were great though and very steady, so no low patches there, just a general ache in the legs.

What was it like racing in Doha? Was there good fan support or any fan support?

The facilities at the Aspire complex are so modern and the nicest sports facility I’ve ever seen, so really it could have been like running anywhere. It was very devoid of the local culture. I was surprised to see that we had more local support than I would have expected. There were quite a few people out watching and cheering.

How does this victory rank among your career highlights? Where does it rank with your WMRC title?

I would say this is one of the top victories I’ve accomplished. The hurt and how deep I had to dig for this makes it pretty special. The fact that seven or eight guys went under 7 hours attests to the high level of competition as well—something that there hasn’t been at many of the past 100K championships. I’d say it’s right on par with that World Mountain Running Championship title (in 2011). It’s a true IAAF World Championship and those always hold a special place in the sporting arena.

 

The post Max King Wins 100K World Championships, Leads U.S. To Team Title appeared first on Competitor.com.

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Photos: Running Kauai’s Na Pali Coast http://running.competitor.com/2014/11/photos/photos-running-kauais-na-pali-coast_118702 http://running.competitor.com/2014/11/photos/photos-running-kauais-na-pali-coast_118702#comments Sat, 22 Nov 2014 18:44:35 +0000 http://running.competitor.com/?p=118702

One of the most stunning trails in the United States was explored recently by two world-class ultrarunners.

The post Photos: Running Kauai’s Na Pali Coast appeared first on Competitor.com.

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Twisting and turning amid lush greenery and the turbulent coastal swells of the Pacific Ocean, the Kalalau Trail winds for 11 magnificent miles along the Na Pali coast of Kauai. The moment you set off along this rugged route, you’re into an adventure unlike anywhere else in the United States.

Recently, ultrarunners Stephanie Howe and Sage Canaday explored the trail, and Competitor was there to capture the journey. Howe is fresh off a victory at the Western States 100 earlier this year, while Canaday has built an impressive resume both on the roads and trails, most recently winning the Pikes Peak Ascent in Colorado.

Here’s a look at their adventure on beautiful Kauai, captured by Competitor photo director Scott Draper:

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